Navarre Beach Oil Spill Important Updates

Discussion of Gulf Oil Spill regarding Navarre Beach, Florida; the good, bad and ugly reports; however most of the reports of oil on Navarre Beach are good!
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Sat May 01, 2010 12:22 pm

Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill Information
Latest Situation Reports for Navarre Beach and Santa Rosa County
CLICK HERE FOR LATEST UPDATES

Please be advised that going forward the “BREAKING NEWS FROM SANTA ROSA COUNTY ABOUT NAVARRE BEACH” and “Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Updates” will be posted under “Special Announcements” at the top of the “Forum Index” page. Just click on the link on the “Forum Index” page for current updates. This will help keep information posts from being redundant.

If you’re not sure where the “Forum Index” Page is for “Special Announcements" go to http://www.navarrebeachlife.com/forum/index.php
___________________________________________________________

Navarre Beach Oil Slick Cleanup Volunteers Info

This thread of messages should help folks that are seeking oil spill information about Navarre Beach. Post your Navarre Beach oil spill comments here!

For Navarre Beach oil slick preparation go to the Santa Rosa County website and click on the link below for the "Latest Situation Report" and "Latest Incident Action Plan (IAP)".

http://www.santarosa.fl.gov/oilspill/index.html


HOW TO VOLUNTEER

BP issued phone numbers for the following response inquiries:

To report oiled wildlife, please call 1-866-557-1401 and leave a message. Messages will be checked hourly.

To discuss spill related damage, please call 1-800-440-0858.

To report oiled shoreline or request volunteer information, please call 1-866-448-5816.

Santa Rosa is registering volunteers through Help Thy Neighbor. Registration numbers are (850) 686-6646 or (850) 287-1352.
Last edited by Kenny Wilder on Sun May 16, 2010 1:12 pm, edited 7 times in total.
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Sat May 01, 2010 12:34 pm

The oil slick is expected to hit Navarre Beach, Pensacola Beach and the Gulf Islands National Seashore that includes Opal Beach on Monday, May 3.
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Sat May 01, 2010 2:02 pm

Image
Fox News is reporting that the Gulf oil spill leak has been upgraded to being 10 times bigger than originally thought.
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Sat May 01, 2010 6:16 pm

Officials prepare for ‘uncontrollable flow’

Navarre Press
www.navarrepress.com
Written by Christine O'Connor
Saturday, 01 May 2010

Santa Rosa County officials pressed forward Saturday with its emergency operation plan in the event oil from the Deepwater Horizon explosion washes along the Navarre Beach shore.

Commission Chairman Gordin Goodin, along with Daniel Hahn, plans section chief with the county’s division of emergency management, held several informal meetings for homeowners on Navarre Beach, educating them on the county’s plan of action, as well as what to expect when the oil washes ashore early next week.

"This is not a normal oil spill caused by some collision," Goodin told a crowd of 25 Navarre Towers condo owners at the Navarre Visitor's Information Center. "This is more like an uncontrolled flow and they're saying it could take anywhere from two to three months to turn it off."

Upwards of 5,000 barrels a day of crude oil has been leaking in the Gulf of Mexico following the April 20 explosion of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig, located off the coast of Louisiana.

According to the Associated Press, officials believe that the amount of oil gushing into the gulf is actually five times that amount.

"We're hoping to God that the six (unmanned) submersibles can get down there and turn it off sooner than that," Goodin said. "But we're talking 18,000 feet deep. And they're building a dome, the likes of which has never been seen before, but that's not expected to be finished until sometime next week. Even then, they're not sure if that will work."

Officials are predicting that the 2,200-square-mile oil slick will ooze onto the sandy white beaches of Santa Rosa County as early as Monday night. Goodin said with the strong winds, they can only predict about 72-hours out.

"You'll notice it long before it reaches our shores," Goodin said. "You'll smell the fumes and it will burn your eyes. There will be tar balls."

Since BP Gas owns the oil, Goodin said the company is responsible financially for any action taken by the government to cleanup the oil.

"There will be a chance for claims on any loss in revenue," Goodin said. "So, keep track of those who are cancelling, if any of you rent out condos."

The county is also taking water samples and soil samples in the hopes to return it to the same quality following cleanup efforts.

"What we'd like is for you to keep records," Goodin said. "Document what the beach looks like now, so we have something to compare it to afterward."

Navarre Press will post more information as it becomes available.

For more information:
www.santarosa.fl.gov
Please monitor your home weather radio and local media outlets for the most up-to-date information.
Your best defense in any disaster is a NOAA Weather radio.
Citizens can sign up to automatically receive breaking news alerts from Santa Rosa County Emergency Management via e-mail or as a text message on their cell phone at: www.santarosa.fl.gov/emergency/publicwarning.html.

Citizen Information Line:
The Citizens Information Line will be open Saturday and Sunday, May 1 & 2 from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Citizens may call (850) 983-INFO (4636) with questions.
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Sat May 01, 2010 6:34 pm

Gulf Islands National Seashore Wildlife At Risk From Oil

Link:
http://www.nationalparkstraveler.com/20 ... sk-oil5794

Brown Pelican at Risk
Image© Photo by Kenny Wilder
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Sat May 01, 2010 6:41 pm

In Santa Rosa County, to volunteer for beach clean up or register for other volunteer opportunities that may arise, ALL volunteers should contact the Volunteer Reception Center operated through Help Thy Neighbors in coordination with emergency management at (850) 686-6646 or (850) 287-1352.

The SRC CERT team will have a clean-up on Navarre Beach Sat. May 1, & Sun May 2, 2010 beginning at 8 am. Meet in the parking lot near the new pier. Bring gloves, hats sunscreen and water. This clean-up is being held in anticipation of the possible impacts if oil from the Deepwater Horizon reaches our shores. It will make the clean-up easier if the debris is removed first.

Remember, do not attempt to clean-up or rescue wildlife that may have come in contact with oil, this could be hazardous to you. Call the BP wildlife hotline, 866-557-1401. BP hired Tri-State Rescue & Research to lead cleanup for birds and its telephone number is 302-737-7241, and the email is hstout@tristatebird.org.

Here are a couple of good websites for updates on the spill:

The Gulf of Mexico Ocean Observation Systems:
http://gcoos.tamu.edu/products/oilspill.html

NOAA Emergency Response:
http://response.restoration.noaa.gov/to ... c_topic)=1

If you have questions or comments, give me a call 850-777-7884.

Chris Verlinde
UF/IFAS Santa Rosa Sea Grant Extension
6263 Dogwood Drive
Milton, FL 32570
850.623.3868
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Sun May 02, 2010 8:15 pm

Latest from Santa Rosa officials

Santa Rosa County public information officials released the latest information on local preparations for the BP oil spill's arrival.

Situation Update
• Local areas are not expected to begin seeing the impact of the Deepwater Horizon collapse in the next 72 hours.

Community Meetings
Two community information meetings are scheduled with county leaders, staff and representatives from BP and DEP:
• Navarre Beach Visitor Information Center located at 8543 Navarre Parkway (U.S. 98) in Navarre, at noon Monday.
• An “One Island” meeting with officials from both Santa Rosa County, the SRIA, and Escambia County at the Pensacola Beach Community Church located at 916 Panferio Drive on Pensacola Beach at 2 p.m. Monday.

Volunteers
• To become a part of the Santa Rosa County volunteer data base for volunteer opportunities that may arise, contact the Volunteer Reception Center operated through Help Thy Neighbors in coordination with emergency management at (850) 983-5223.

• Weekend volunteer stats:
o Approximately 250 volunteers gave an estimated 1,000 hours to clean up Navarre Beach on Saturday and Sunday.
o An estimated 155 lbs. or man-made garbage was collected. Natural debris was placed above the high water line.
Actions Taken By Santa Rosa County

• Emergency management staff had identified long and short term objectives, to include but not limited to:

o Identify training needed for workers and volunteers to participate in clean-up
o Monitor water for oil or affected wildlife
o Document local resources used
o Research and track financial impacts and tourism
o Prepare contingency plan for response to protect Santa Rosa resources
o Monitor requests made to unified command

• Maps, including overall locations and a priority listing, of the U.S. Coast Guard’s booming strategy are available online at www.santarosa.fl.gov/oilspill. Additional locations have also been suggested by Santa Rosa County through the unified command system including the 3-Mile, Garcon Point, Bob Sikes and I-10 bridges.
• A local state of emergency was declared at 3 p.m., Friday, April 30, allowing the county to implement proactive measures as needed.
• Emergency management officials continue to participate in the unified command and State of Florida Department of Emergency Management conference calls to obtain the lasted information to plan our role accordingly.
• Pre-qualified debris contractors and environmental engineering consultants have been contacted and are ready to respond as required.
• The EOC is will activate at a level 2, or partial activation with essential staff, at 8 a.m.- 5 p.m. on Monday until further notice.

• The Santa Rosa County Citizen Information Line at (850) 983-INFO or 4636 is open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. daily.
• For more information www.santarosa.fl.gov/oilspill
NOAA Closes Commercial and Recreational Fishing in Oil-Affected Portion of Gulf of Mexico
• NOAA is restricting fishing for a minimum of 10 days in federal waters most affected by the BP oil spill, largely between Louisiana state waters at the mouth of the Mississippi River to waters off Florida’s Pensacola Bay. The closure is effective immediately.
• Details can be found at: http://sero.nmfs.noaa.gov/
• Fishermen who wish to contact BP about a claim should call (800) 440-0858.

About the Booming Strategy
• Boom placement will be based on tides and where the oil is threatening.
• The U.S. Coast Guard’s booming strategy for Santa Rosa County focuses on identified environmentally sensitive areas. Estuaries and inlets are at the top of the list, not the beach areas. This is to protect sensitive habitat that support wildlife and fish. If the oil washes on the beach, the sand can be cleaned. If the oil reaches the estuaries and inlets, it could be devastating to our local wildlife and fish habitat, taking years to recover.
• Please note booms are not a fail safe solution. They can become ineffective in high seas, strong winds, or currents over one knot. Resources are currently staged in Pensacola in preparation for a response for our area.
• Santa Rosa County is working through the Florida Emergency Operations Center under the incident command of the Secretary of the Department of Environmental Protection and ultimately the unified command currently operational in Mobile. Our county provides input, but the operational decisions are through the unified command. Santa Rosa County continues to work to maximize protection and minimize impacts.

Precautions for Affected Areas
• Avoid entering areas where oil can be seen or smelled. If you see or smell oil, leave the area right away.
• Avoid direct skin contact with oil, oil-contaminated water and sediments.
• Do not swim or ski in areas affected by the oil spill, and if you travel through the area by boat, take precautions when hoisting the boat anchor. If you get oil on your skin, wash it off immediately with soap and water.
• Do not fish in the oil spill-affected waters.
• Do not harvest and eat dead fish, fish with oily residue or fish that have a petroleum odor.
• Do not drive your boat through slicks or sheens.
• Young children, pregnant women, people with compromised immune systems, and individuals with underlying respiratory conditions should avoid the area.
• Restrict pets from entering oil-contaminated areas.
Tarball Safety
• For most people, an occasional brief contact with a small amount of oil, while not recommended, will do no harm. However, some people are especially sensitive to chemicals, including the hydrocarbons found in crude oil and petroleum products. They may have an allergic reaction or develop rashes even from brief contact with oil. In general, we recommend that contact with oil be avoided.
• If contact occurs, wash the area with soap and water, baby oil, or a widely used, safe cleaning compound such as cleaning paste sold at auto parts stores.
• Avoid using solvents, gasoline, kerosene, diesels fuel, or similar products on the skin.

Air Quality
Some individuals are more susceptible to change in air quality due to medical conditions. Anyone who is concerned about change in air quality due to this event should contact their primary health care provider, as each of us has a unique health profile.
• As with wildfires and other events that increases particulate matter in the air, consider staying inside, in an air-conditioned room and change the air-conditioner filter to ensure peak performance.
• Avoid strenuous activities outside.
• If you have difficulty breathing, shortness of breath or other serious symptoms, seek immediate medical attention
• Individuals with an air quality question or concern should contact the Environmental Protection Agency Region 4 National Response Center at 1-800-424-8802.

Boats
• Boat traffic is highly encouraged to avoid any spill areas.
Boats that must transit through affected zones should maintain a safe speed through the oil that appears light, bright, and on the surface.
• Boats should make every effort to avoid pockets of heavy black oil.
• Boat owners are urged to dry-dock boats.
• Boaters should avoid booms and should not drive over any booms.

About the Oil
• The oil condition that is expected to impact shorelines is predicted to be a gel or paste-like emulsion and of tarball consistency, stranding in a discontinuous and patchy manner. The oil is also expected to be brown, sticky and possibly a emitting a sheen associated with emulsified oil.
• Due to the low aromatic content, the acute toxicity is low relative to fresher oil.
• It will stick to emergent and aquatic vegetation, birds, fur-bearing mammals and retiles.
Affects on Wildlife
• The affect on wildlife can include: smothering of invertebrates, ingestion, loss of ability to thermoregulate, eye and mucus membrane irritation, and transport of oil through marshes by animals
• The biodegradation is slow, which could lead to chronic effects on fish, invertebrates, and wildlife.
• Toxicity or harmful effects are dependent upon:
o mixture and types of chemicals that make up the oil or are used to clean up the oil,
o amount of exposure (dose for internal exposures or time for external exposures),
o route of exposure (inhaled, ingested, absorbed, or external), and
o Biomedical risk factors of the animal (age, sex, reproductive stage, and health status). For turtles this will include differing impacts and vulnerabilities at the different life stages such as eggs, post-hatchlings, juveniles and adults. For cetaceans this will include neonates, calves, juveniles and adults.

Habitat Impact
• The habitats with the highest sensitivity are mangroves, marshes, barrier islands, sheltered tidal flats, and shallow sub-tidal areas.
• The lowest is sandy beach because it is the easiest to clean, as both manual and heavy equipment may be used.

Impact on Seafood
• Crude oil has the potential to taint seafood with flavors and odors imparted by exposure to hydrocarbon chemicals. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulate the presence of hydrocarbons as a possible adulterant in seafood.
• The public should not be concerned about the safety of seafood they are buying at this time. The spill has not reached the coastal area and the seafood on the market has not been affected. The Federal and State governments have strong systems in place to test and monitor seafood safety and to prohibit harvesting from affected areas, keeping oiled products out of the market.
• NOAA Fisheries is working closely with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the States to ensure seafood safety.

Clean-Up Jobs
• Workforce Escarosa, Inc. will host hiring events in effort to recruit and screen applicants for an estimated 500 clean-up jobs with Advanced Employment Solutions on the following dates:
o Monday, May 3- 9 a.m. until 1 p.m., Workforce Escarosa Pensacola One-Stop located at 3670-A North L
o Tuesday, May 4- 1 p.m. until 4 p.m., Workforce Escarosa Milton One-Stop located at 5725 Hwy. 90
o Wednesday, May 5- 9 a.m. until 1 p.m., Workforce Escarosa Pensacola One-Stop located at 3670-A North L Street
o Wednesday, May 5- 9 a.m. until 1 p.m., Workforce Escarosa Century One-Stop located at 8120 North Century Blvd.
• Applicants must bring proof of U.S. citizenship, a valid driver’s license, and any relevant credentials. For more information, visit www.employflorida.com and search for job order numbers 9481666, 9481677, 9481703, 9481718, and 9481331.

BP Claim Line
• BP has established a claim system that will allow people to begin the process to recover lost income or recoup damage related expense at (800)-440-0858.

Vessels of Opportunity (boats) program
• BP is looking to contract shrimp boats, oyster boats and other vessels for hire through the Vessel of Opportunities Program to deploy boom in the Gulf of Mexico. For more information (425) 745-8017

Alternative Response Technology
• To submit alternative response technology, services or products please email horizonsupport@oegllc.com or call (281) 366-5511.
Oiled Wildlife
• To report oiled wildlife, please call 1-866-557-1401 and leave a message. Messages will be checked hourly. Individuals are urged not to attempt to help injured or oiled animals, but to report any sightings to the toll free number.

Report Oil Sightings
• To report oiled shoreline, please call 1-866-448-5816.

Other Contact Numbers
• Transocean hotline: 832-587-8554
• MI Swaco hotline: 888-318-6765
• BP Investor Relations: 381-366-3123
• BP family hotline: 281-36-578
• BP third party contractor hotline: 281-366-5578
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Sun May 02, 2010 9:17 pm

Emerald Coast Wildlife Refuge

ECWR Response to Oiled Wildlife Update


Hello All,

(Note: to any of you with friends on the Emerald Coast, please forward this link to as many people as possible)

Sorry, this is a long one....

Today I have been in contact with incident command in Pensacola, specifically with BP's Wildlife Response coordinator for our area. I (the ECWR) am now their the POC for local response to oiled wildlife. I have also put in a request with BP's training coordinator to conduct volunteer training for the general public in our area, but have not received a response as yet.

There is a bird wash station being set up by Tri--State, the contracted response group, in Pensacola and I have been in contact with them and hope to visit the site soon. We are also actively working to set up our own holding and possibly washing stations locally as well.

I want to re-emphasize that we are ready and able to respond to oiled wildlife, and are on call 24/7. Oiled wildlife will be suffering from shock, hypo or hyperthermia, and stress and is typically stabilized for 24 - 48 hours before washing begins. Calling us directly at 850-650-1880 will save valuable time in the treatment process.

If you find a suspected oiled animal please call us immediately. We will provide rescue and supportive care until the animal is ready for transport to one of the regional wash and rehab stations. The BP Oiled Wildlife Hotline is not manned and will be checked for messages hourly, thus delaying response time.

Please remember that once the oil is on the beach only individuals with specific training will be allowed onto the beach to conduct rescues, and under no circumstances should you handle a suspected oiled animal.

In support of our holding and stabilization areas we are asking for donations of the following items:

Baby blankets
Towels
Heating pads (w/o auto shut off if possible)
Large Rubbermaid containers with lids
Heating lamps
Rubbermaid troughs (can be purchased at Tractor Supply in Crestview or on-line)
Large backyard portable pools like found at Wal-Mart

I realize that the information about volunteering has been confused and at time inaccurate, for our part we are logging everyone who calls and will forward any solid information as we get it. As our response duties and needs become clearer, we will of course contact you with those needs.

Our biggest need at this time is for people who are willing to answer the phone at the refuge. You will respond to callers' frequently asked questions and add names to the volunteer list. Remember, every effort is important and valuable. Please contact Susan at 650-1880 if you are able to come in to answer the phone.

Now more than ever, the ECWR also needs the assistance of our trained volunteers in day-to-day operations. Please check your calendars and give Susan a call if you have some extra time to lend a hand.

Thank you all for your patience and support, I have been in personal contact with a friend that has worked spills all over the world, and she thinks this may be the one of the worst ever...so we will need you.

P_

Patrick Gault
Assistant Director/Biologist
ECWR
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Mon May 03, 2010 11:20 am

Community Meetings Today About Oil Slick

Two community information meetings are scheduled with county leaders, staff and representatives from BP and DEP:

1. Navarre Beach Visitor InformationCenter located at 8543 Navarre Parkwayin Navarre, at noon, Monday, May 3 (VERY LIMITED CAPACITY--Consider attending the next meeting at a bigger venue, below:)

2. An "One Island" meeting with officials from both Santa RosaCounty, the SRIA, and EscambiaCounty at the Pensacola Beach Community Church located at 916 Panferio Drive on Pensacola Beach at 2 p.m., Monday, May 3
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Mon May 03, 2010 3:14 pm

Few answers at oil spill meeting in Navarre

Pensacola News Journal
LOUIS COOPER • LCOOPER@PNJ.COM • MAY 3, 2010


There were more questions than answers at a public meeting this afternoon in Navarre with government officials and representatives of BP about the ever-growing oil slick threatening Northwest Florida.

"From zero to 10, what are we looking at, in a worst scenario? Are we looking at, like, a nine impact?" asked Navarre resident Lisa Peek. "Is it going to be really bad? On the long term, are we looking at four years or five years? Does anybody really know?"

The answer: Not really.

"In all honestly, I can't answer that. I could tell you my guess, but I really don't have one," said Darryl Boudreau, assistant district director of the state Department of Environmental Protection. "If the control technology (BP) is trying works, it's going to be much less. If it doesn't work and it's going to take more time to shut the flow off, I would say we're more toward the 10."

Ira Mae Bruce, the owner of Century 21 Island View Realty and a member of the Santa Rosa County Tourist Development Council, said she is worried about the impact the spill may have on tourism at Navarre Beach.

Although BP has pledged to reimburse expenses associated with the spill, Bruce said she has been unable to get through on claim lines.

"We can't wait three or four years (to get reimbursed)," Bruce said. "We're going to be laying people off in a week or two if we don't get help soon."

BP representative Liz Castro assured her claims would be processed quickly.

"I can't give you a specific (number of days) timeline,' Castro said. "I can tell you it will be handled promptly."

About 100 people filled the conference room and adjoining hallway at the Navarre Visitor Center, where the meeting was held.
A similar meeting started at 2 p.m. on Pensacola Beach, where hundreds of people are packed this afternoon into the Pensacola Beach Community Church sanctuary.

The sanctuary was standing room-only by the time the meeting started, and the parking lot was filled to overflowing outside the "One Island" meeting. Officials from the Santa Rosa Island Authority and Santa Rosa and Escambia counties were on hand to speak about efforts under way to guard area waterways.

Check back throughout the afternoon for updates. Pnj.com also will post video later from the Pensacola Beach meeting.
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Mon May 03, 2010 4:46 pm

MY COMMENTS ABOUT TODAY’S MEETING WITH BP

My comment to the Associated Press
I spoke at the meeting today and said “Why don’t we just go to the oil spill site and bomb the hell out of it”. The Associated Press said they may run my quote as their lead quote.

BP representatives
I have never been in a public meeting before where the people invited to answer the questions of concerned citizens were as unprepared as BT was today. Folks it appears to me that BT is in uncharted territory and that they don’t have a clue as how to deal with this oil spill disaster. A video of today’s meeting should be available this afternoon on the Santa Rosa County website http://www.santarosa.fl.gov/oilspill/index.html - It has not been posted yet.

Santa Rosa County
The County has to take the lead from BP, U.S. Coast Guard, and the Florida DEP. None of these agencies could answer the questions from the citizens because they too are in uncharted territory. I sincerely believe that the County and the Florida DEP are responding the best that they can.

What can we expect?
The only thing that I can see about our situation is twofold. First, the oil slick impact should not be as great on Navarre Beach, because a beach is easier to clean. Secondly, the impact to Pensacola Bay, Escambia Bay, East Bay and the Santa Rosa Sound could cause great harm to the sea grass and salt marsh in these types of waters. If they are impacted it could take decades for these fragile eco-systems to recover. Of course these are only my opinions. The latest information is that the oil slick in the form of a light sheen on top of the water may come ashore on Navarre Beach on Wednesday weather permitting.
Last edited by Kenny Wilder on Mon May 03, 2010 11:48 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Mon May 03, 2010 6:18 pm

I agree Kenny. The two people sent were unprepared. They appeared as the sacraficial lambs.
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Mon May 03, 2010 11:34 pm

Fla. tourism businesses brace as oil slick nears

By SARAH LARIMER
Associated Press Writer


Florida tourism leaders and workers from Pensacola to Key West grew increasingly angry and worried Monday as an oil slick created by a blown out drilling rig off Louisiana moved closer to the state's shores and threatened their livelihoods.

Gov. Charlie Crist expanded a state of emergency Monday to include 19 counties from Escambia in the Panhandle to Sarasota in southwest Florida. The massive spill caused by the explosion of a BP PLC oil rig two weeks ago has been slowly moving toward Florida and oil might start washing ashore in the Panhandle by Tuesday and could reach the Keys by the weekend.

"We have an ecological and environmental disaster in the making," U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Fla., said at a tourism meeting Monday in Orlando. "This could not only be an economic disaster for Florida and our $65 billion tourism industry, which depends on pristine beaches but also an environmental disaster because of our bays and estuaries that spawn so much marine life. People in the Panhandle are panicked. They're about to start their tourism season and they're facing the oil spill."

At a meeting in Navarre, Florida Panhandle residents and business owners peppered officials with concerns and questions, demanding to know how the spill would affect their homes, health and future and what the company and government were doing to stop the spill's spread.

"Would it be possible to just go out there and bomb the hell out of it?" said Kenny Wilder, 67, of Navarre, just east of Pensacola.

"I don't want to look like Detroit, all boarded up here," said 46-year-old Montana Kurtz-Minck, who fears that a beauty product business she owns and a surf school where she works could fail because of the spill. She asked a BP representative who would pay her mortgages when she was unemployed, and was directed to a BP hot line. Another attendee said the line has been constantly jammed.

"We've been trying to call, call, call and the lines are always busy," Ira Mae Bruce said. Another said a hot line operator took a message last week but the company hasn't called him back.

A similar community meeting was held in Pensacola Beach later in the day.

The spill began April 20 when a drilling rig exploded off the coast of Louisiana, killing 11 workers. It has been spewing up to 200,000 gallons of oil per day into the Gulf with little to no relief expected for at least another week. The spill now covers thousands of square miles and is getting close to the Loop Current, which speeds south through the Gulf and into the Florida Keys. It then hits the Gulf Stream, which could then drive the oil north along Florida's Atlantic Coast.

Nick Shay, a physical oceanographer at the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, suspects that oil is already getting into the periphery of the Loop Current and will likely end up in the Keys "relatively quickly."

"Certainly within a week," Shay said. "It will impact coral reefs and fisheries and the ecosystem of the entire Florida Keys."

And that has some Keys residents starting to worry.

"I am not going to lie and say we haven't been discussing it amongst ourselves. But it doesn't seem like there is a whole lot we can do about it here. We are so utterly helpless," said Luke Abbey, an employee at Subtropic Dive Center in Key West. "Our money is made on the water. So, if there is an oil slick on the water, there is no diving."

He said there are three sports in Key West: "Drinking, fishing and diving. In that order. The only thing that is not going to be affected is drinking."

But other Keys business leaders were taking a wait-and-see attitude Monday. The island chain has avoided economic disaster when hurricanes turned away at the last minute and they hope the oil slick will do the same. If it does come, they hope the economic damage will be minimal.

"There are so many things to do here, and it's a destination usually planned in advance. I don't think people would be making changes," said Cindy Derocher, general manager of the Gardens Hotel in Key West.

David Yates, the CEO of Clearwater Marine Aquarium, which specializes in rehabilitating injured marine wildlife, said his facility and others would treat any dolphins, manatees, turtles and other sea life injured by the spill. Officials believe the animals could suffer respiratory problems and damage to soft tissue like their eyes and mouths.

John Adornato, a regional director with the National Parks Conservation Association, said that the oil spill could seep into Florida Bay, part of the Everglades, and linger in shallow water basins and mangroves. That could affect wading birds, fish and other species that live in the area.

The state's fishing industry has already been damaged - the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration on Sunday shut down commercial and recreational fishing from Louisiana to parts of the Florida Panhandle, saying the closure would last for at least 10 days. The ban could be expanded as the spill spreads.

Crist says officials don't yet have an estimate of what it's going to cost to clean up the state's beaches and waters if the spill reaches the state.

Crist, though, said Monday that Florida would send the bill to the "responsible party" - BP PLC.

Crist said he shared the frustration of local officials who are worried about not having enough floating booms to protect their beaches. The booms are strung together in the water as a barrier to keep the oil offshore.

Florida would "have to do the best with what we have," Crist said.

Back in the Panhandle, Dana Powell, the manager of the Paradise Inn in Pensacola Beach, said Monday that while tourists are starting to cancel, she thinks her hotel will do OK for now because oil cleanup workers will need rooms and will replace some of the lost income.

The cleanup workers "won't be having as much fun, but they might be buying more liquor at the bar because they'll be so depressed," she said.
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Tue May 04, 2010 12:03 am

FROM:
Chris Verlinde
UF/IFAS Santa Rosa Sea Grant Extension
6263 Dogwood Drive
Milton, FL 32570
850.623.3868


fyi, it looks like SRC will offer some hazmat training, I will keep you all updated.

Deepwater Horizon Incident Update #4

Situation Update• Local areas are not expected to begin seeing the impact of the Deepwater Horizon collapse in the next 72 hours.
• Residents may have or begin to notice an odor carried in by the winds from off shore.
• Individuals concerned about air quality issues can view an up-to-date map with pollutant concentrations at www.santarosa.fl.gov/oilspill or www.airnow.gov, or they can report suspected changes in air quality at http://www.epa.gov/bpspill/.

Community Meetings• Two community information meetings were held today with over 400 people combined attending. Video of the Navarre Visitor’s Center meeting will be posted by noon tomorrow at www.santarosa.fl.gov/oilspill.
• Future community meetings will be announced as they are scheduled.
• Santa Rosa County officials and emergency management staff are available to speak to groups, please contact 983-5360 for more details.

Volunteers
• Today alone, over 60 volunteers and seven volunteer groups with 10-60 members each, registered to volunteer for future oil spill response.
• Trainings for Santa Rosa County volunteers are currently being scheduled. Times and locations are anticipated to be announced no later than Wednesday.
• To become a part of the Santa Rosa County volunteer data base for volunteer opportunities that may arise, contact the Volunteer Reception Center operated through Help Thy Neighbors in coordination with emergency management at (850) 983-5223.


Actions Taken By Santa Rosa County
• Emergency management staff had identified long and short term objectives, to include but not limited to:
o Identify training needed for workers and volunteers to participate in clean-up
o Monitor water for oil or affected wildlife
o Document local resources used
o Research and track financial impacts and tourism
o Prepare contingency plan for response to protect Santa Rosa resources
o Monitor requests made to unified command
• Maps, including overall locations and a priority listing, of the U.S. Coast Guard’s booming strategy are available online at www.santarosa.fl.gov/oilspill. Additional locations have also been suggested by Santa Rosa County through the unified command system including the 3-Mile, Garcon Point, Bob Sikes and I-10 bridges.
o Additional information was provided as requested today by unified command regarding Santa Rosa County’s booming suggestions including:
 Wildlife that would be protected
 Habitat that would be protected
 Species that would be threatened
 Suggested collection points
 Possible staging areas
 Length needed
 Protection strategy
• Santa Rosa County will watch for possible cases of contractor fraud related to the oil spill, will track and document these cases, and submit the information to state officials.
• A local state of emergency was declared at 3 p.m., Friday, April 30, allowing the county to implement proactive measures as needed.
• Emergency management officials continue to participate in the unified command and State of Florida Department of Emergency Management conference calls to obtain the lasted information to plan our role accordingly.
• Pre-qualified debris contractors and environmental engineering consultants have been contacted and are ready to respond as required.
• The EOC is activated at a level 2, or partial activation with essential staff, from 8 a.m.- 5 p.m. until further notice.
• The Santa Rosa County Citizen Information Line at (850) 983-INFO or 4636 is open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. daily.
• For more information www.santarosa.fl.gov/oilspill

BP Resources
• 90,000 feet of boom has been placed in our region.
• Due to weather conditions, only 3,000 feet was placed today.
• The goal for our region is 19,000 feet per day.

NOAA Closes Commercial and Recreational Fishing in Oil-Affected Portion of Gulf of Mexico
• NOAA is restricting fishing for a minimum of ten days in federal waters most affected by the BP oil spill, largely between Louisiana state waters at the mouth of the Mississippi River to waters off Florida’s Pensacola Bay. The closure is effective immediately.
• Details can be found at: http://sero.nmfs.noaa.gov/
• Fishermen who wish to contact BP about a claim should call (800) 440-0858.

About the Booming Strategy
• Boom placement will be based on tides and where the oil is threatening.
• The U.S. Coast Guard’s booming strategy for Santa Rosa County focuses on identified environmentally sensitive areas. Estuaries and inlets are at the top of the list, not the beach areas. This is to protect sensitive habitat that support wildlife and fish. If the oil washes on the beach, the sand can be cleaned. If the oil reaches the estuaries and inlets, it could be devastating to our local wildlife and fish habitat, taking years to recover.
• Please note booms are not a fail safe solution. They can become ineffective in high seas, strong winds, or currents over one knot. Resources are currently staged in Pensacola in preparation for a response for our area.
• Santa Rosa County is working through the Florida Emergency Operations Center under the incident command of the Secretary of the Department of Environmental Protection and ultimately the unified command currently operational in Mobile. Our county provides input, but the operational decisions are through the unified command. Santa Rosa County continues to work to maximize protection and minimize impacts.

Precautions for Affected Areas
• Avoid entering areas where oil can be seen or smelled. If you see or smell oil, leave the area right away.
• Avoid direct skin contact with oil, oil-contaminated water and sediments.
• Do not swim or ski in areas affected by the oil spill, and if you travel through the area by boat, take precautions when hoisting the boat anchor. If you get oil on your skin, wash it off immediately with soap and water.
• Do not fish in the oil spill-affected waters.
• Do not harvest and eat dead fish, fish with oily residue or fish that have a petroleum odor.
• Do not drive your boat through slicks or sheens.
• Young children, pregnant women, people with compromised immune systems, and individuals with underlying respiratory conditions should avoid the area.
• Restrict pets from entering oil-contaminated areas.

Tarball Safety
• For most people, an occasional brief contact with a small amount of oil, while not recommended, will do no harm. However, some people are especially sensitive to chemicals, including the hydrocarbons found in crude oil and petroleum products. They may have an allergic reaction or develop rashes even from brief contact with oil. In general, we recommend that contact with oil be avoided.
• If contact occurs, wash the area with soap and water, baby oil, or a widely used, safe cleaning compound such as cleaning paste sold at auto parts stores.
• Avoid using solvents, gasoline, kerosene, diesels fuel, or similar products on the skin.

Air Quality
Some individuals are more susceptible to change in air quality due to medical conditions. Anyone who is concerned about change in air quality due to this event should contact their primary health care provider, as each of us has a unique health profile.
• As with wildfires and other events that increases particulate matter in the air, consider staying inside, in an air-conditioned room and change the air-conditioner filter to ensure peak performance.
• Avoid strenuous activities outside.
• If you have difficulty breathing, shortness of breath or other serious symptoms, seek immediate medical attention
• Individuals with an air quality question or concern should contact the Environmental Protection Agency Region 4 National Response Center at 1-800-424-8802.

Boats• Boat traffic is highly encouraged to avoid any spill areas.
• Boats that must transit through affected zones should maintain a safe speed through the oil that appears light, bright, and on the surface.
• Boats should make every effort to avoid pockets of heavy black oil.
• Boat owners are urged to dry-dock boats.
• Boater should avoid booms and should not drive over any booms.

About the Oil
• The oil condition that is expected to impact shorelines is predicted to be a gel or paste-like emulsion and of tarball consistency, stranding in a discontinuous and patchy manner. The oil is also expected to be brown, sticky and possibly a emitting a sheen associated with emulsified oil.
• Due to the low aromatic content, the acute toxicity is low relative to fresher oil.
• It will stick to emergent and aquatic vegetation, birds, fur-bearing mammals and retiles.

Affects on Wildlife

• The affect on wildlife can include: smothering of invertebrates, ingestion, loss of ability to thermoregulate, eye and mucus membrane irritation, and transport of oil through marshes by animals
• The biodegradation is slow, which could lead to chronic effects on fish, invertebrates, and wildlife.
• Toxicity or harmful effects are dependent upon:
o mixture and types of chemicals that make up the oil or are used to clean up the oil,
o amount of exposure (dose for internal exposures or time for external exposures),
o route of exposure (inhaled, ingested, absorbed, or external), and
o Biomedical risk factors of the animal (age, sex, reproductive stage, and health status). For turtles this will include differing impacts and vulnerabilities at the different life stages such as eggs, post-hatchlings, juveniles and adults. For cetaceans this will include neonates, calves, juveniles and adults.

Habitat Impact• The habitats with the highest sensitivity are mangroves, marshes, barrier islands, sheltered tidal flats, and shallow sub-tidal areas.
• The lowest is sandy beach because it is the easiest to clean, as both manual and heavy equipment may be used.

Impact on Seafood
• Crude oil has the potential to taint seafood with flavors and odors imparted by exposure to hydrocarbon chemicals. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulate the presence of hydrocarbons as a possible adulterant in seafood.
• The public should not be concerned about the safety of seafood they are buying at this time. The spill has not reached the coastal area and the seafood on the market has not been affected. The Federal and State governments have strong systems in place to test and monitor seafood safety and to prohibit harvesting from affected areas, keeping oiled products out of the market.
• NOAA Fisheries is working closely with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the States to ensure seafood safety.

Clean-Up Jobs• Workforce Escarosa, Inc. will host hiring events in effort to recruit and screen applicants for an estimated 500 clean-up jobs with Advanced Employment Solutions on the following dates:
o Tuesday, May 4- 1 p.m. until 4 p.m., Workforce Escarosa Milton One-Stop located at 5725 Hwy. 90
o Wednesday, May 5- 9 a.m. until 1 p.m., Workforce Escarosa Pensacola One-Stop located at 3670-A North L Street
o Wednesday, May 5- 9 a.m. until 1 p.m., Workforce Escarosa Century One-Stop located at 8120 North Century Blvd.
• Applicants must bring proof of U.S. citizenship, a valid driver’s license, and any relevant credentials. For more information, visit www.employflorida.com and search for job order numbers 9481666, 9481677, 9481703, 9481718, and 9481331.

BP Claim Line
• BP has established a claim system that will allow people to begin the process to recover lost income or recoup damage related expense at (800)-440-0858.

Vessels of Opportunity (boats) program
• BP is looking to contract shrimp boats, oyster boats and other vessels for hire through the Vessel of Opportunities Program to deploy boom in the Gulf of Mexico. For more information (425) 745-8017

Alternative Response Technology• To submit alternative response technology, services or products please email horizonsupport@oegllc.com or call (281) 366-5511.

Oiled WildlifeTo report oiled wildlife, please call 1-866-557-1401 and leave a message. Messages will be checked hourly. Individuals are urged not to attempt to help injured or oiled animals, but to report any sightings to the toll free number.

Report Oil Sightings
• To report oiled shoreline, please call 1-866-448-5816.

Other Contact Numbers• Transocean hotline: 832-587-8554
• MI Swaco hotline: 888-318-6765
• BP Investor Relations: 381-366-3123
• BP family hotline: 281-36-578
• BP third party contractor hotline: 281-366-5578

General Safety Information www.santarosa.fl.gov
• Please monitor your home weather radio and local media outlets for the most up-to-date information.
• Your best defense in any disaster is a NOAA Weather radio.
• Citizens can signup to automatically receive breaking news alerts from Santa Rosa County Emergency Management via e-mail or as a text message on their cell phone at: www.santarosa.fl.gov/emergency/publicwarning.html.

Citizen Information Line
• The Santa Rosa County Citizen Information Line at (850) 983-INFO or 4636 is open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. daily.
• Citizens may call (850) 983-INFO (4636) with questions.

###

Joy Tsubooka
Public Information Officer
Santa Rosa County
4499 Pine Forest Road
Milton, FL 32583
(850) 983-5254
(850) 393-8304 cell
www.santarosa.fl.gov
bereadyescambia.com/training/

Remember, do not attempt to clean-up or rescue wildlife that may have come in contact with oil, this could be hazardous to you. Call the BP wildlife hotline, 866-557-1401. BP hired Tri-State Rescue & Research to lead cleanup for birds and its telephone number is 302-737-7241, and the email is hstout@tristatebird.org. Local contacts will be established soon.

Chris Verlinde
UF/IFAS Santa Rosa Sea Grant Extension
6263 Dogwood Drive
Milton, FL 32570
850.623.3868
Kenny Wilder
NavarreBeachLife.com ~ Owner/Administrator
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Florida Master Naturalist ~ Coastal Systems and Wetlands
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User avatar
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Tue May 04, 2010 10:38 am

Residents, county brace for impact

Navarre Press
Written by Christine O'Connor
Tuesday, 04 May 2010


Residents and business owners of Santa Rosa County walked away with more questions than answers following a community information meeting with key officials on the local impact of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion.

More than 100 concerned citizens packed the conference room of the Navarre Visitor’s Information Center Monday, where the first of two informational meetings were held, facilitated by Santa Rosa County officials, along with spokespersons from BP American Inc. and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection.

VIDEO: LISTEN TO THE ENTIRE MEETING
http://www.navarrepress.com/20100504214 ... ounty.html
Kenny Wilder
NavarreBeachLife.com ~ Owner/Administrator
Constitutional Conservative
Florida Master Naturalist ~ Coastal Systems and Wetlands
Forum Rules and Regulations (Terms of Service)
Are You Going to Heaven?
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