Navarre Beach Oil Spill Important Updates

Discussion of Gulf Oil Spill regarding Navarre Beach, Florida; the good, bad and ugly reports; however most of the reports of oil on Navarre Beach are good!
User avatar
Kenny Wilder
Power User
Power User
Posts: 7068
Joined: Thu Aug 24, 2006 4:52 pm
Location: Navarre, Florida
Contact:

Tue May 04, 2010 1:07 pm

Clean-up Operations

The clean-up operations from any oil that may reach the beaches or inland waterways is being administered by the US Coast Guard. Emergency management personnel from Santa Rosa County will be under the guidance of the Coast Guard.

NO ONE is authorized to handle any tar or chemical that washes ashore or that is floating in the water unless properly trained. Only those trained by OSHA and EPA will be allowed to handle this material. If you wish to be trained or wish to volunteer for the clean-up, please call 1-866-448-5816 and be properly trained.

Charter boat captains or other captains who would like to assist with any efforts taking place on the water must call 425-745-8017 to be put on the list and trained.

The Govenor has assured everyone that the state will provide all possible and available resources to combat the spill as it enters Florida's waters.

Please respect the requests of the US Coast Guard and DEP as they lead this effort. The work being done is under their command. Any interference with their work or procedures could drastically hurt our collective efforts in limiting the damage from the oil spill.
Kenny Wilder
NavarreBeachLife.com ~ Owner/Administrator
Constitutional Conservative
Florida Master Naturalist ~ Coastal Systems and Wetlands
Forum Rules and Regulations (Terms of Service)
Are You Going to Heaven?
User avatar
Kenny Wilder
Power User
Power User
Posts: 7068
Joined: Thu Aug 24, 2006 4:52 pm
Location: Navarre, Florida
Contact:

Tue May 04, 2010 5:50 pm

Deepwater Horizon county action update #5

According to the Florida Department of Emergency Management, oil impact to immediate coastal areas is currently not expected in Florida through the next 72 hours.

Several residents have reported brown or black foam on Navarre Beach. The foam is natural and not a result of the oil spill. DEP has tested local areas and will make the results public.

Residents may have or begin to notice an odor carried in by the winds from off shore.


Individuals concerned about air quality issues can view an up-to-date map with pollutant concentrations at www.santarosa.fl.gov/oilspill or www.airnow.gov, or they can report suspected changes in air quality at http://www.epa.gov/bpspill/.

Community Meetings
The community meetings held on Monday, May 2 are available at www.santarosa.fl.gov/oilspill.
Questions asked by attendees at yesterday's meeting are being complied and will be sent to BP for follow up.
Future community meetings will be announced as they are scheduled.
Santa Rosa County officials and emergency management staff are available to speak to groups, please contact 983-5360 for more details.

Booming in Santa Rosa County
The following sites have been placed or were scheduled to be placed today:
Aquatic Preserve Yellow River (site # PEN12)- placed
Boathouse Bar (site # PEN28)- awaiting confirmation that it was placed today
Central Oyster Bed (site # PEN21)- awaiting confirmation that it was placed today
Deadman Island (site # PEN32)- placed
Gulf Island National Seashore Live Oaks (site # PEN7)- awaiting confirmation that it was placed today
Indian Bayou Oyster Bar (site # PEN29)- awaiting confirmation that it was placed today
Live Oaks National Seashore (site # PEN11)- placed
Mullato Bayou (site # PEN45)- placed
North Oyster Bed (site # PEN20)- placed
North Oyster Bed (site # PEN20)- awaiting confirmation that it was placed today
Red Fish Cover Oyster Reef (site # PEN19)- placed
Santa Rosa Island Shoreline (site # PEN18)- placed
Santa Rosa Island Gulf Island National Seashore (site # PEN13)- placed
Shoreline Park (site # PEN30)- placed
Southern Bayou Tarar (site # PEN14)- placed
Western Shore Aquatic Vegetation site # PEN43)- placed
Maps, including overall locations and a priority listing, of the U.S. Coast Guard's booming strategy are available online at www.santarosa.fl.gov/oilspill. Additional locations have also been suggested by Santa Rosa County through the unified command system including the 3-Mile, Garcon Point, Bob Sikes and I-10 bridges.

BP Resources
The Governor stated that BP has put up a $25 million Block Grant for the State of Florida.
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with Tri-State Bird Rescue & Research, a BP contractor, to provide assistance to oiled wildlife. The service recognizes Tri-State's expertise in wildlife oil spill response, and while many wildlife organizations and individuals have expressed interest in providing their assistance, all rehabilitation efforts must be coordinated through the service and Tri-State. Coordination is vitally important for recovery and research efforts, and specific safety and other requirements must be met before anyone will be allowed on-site for any participation. If you already have wildlife training, call BP at 1-866-557-1401.
Programs Currently being worked on
Shoreline Assessment/Clean Up Plan
Pre Impact Debris Removal Program
New Staging Area in Panama City being mobilized (85% complete)
90,000 feet of boom has been placed in our region as of Monday afternoon.
Today's goal was to place an additional 35,000 feet of boom.
Boom quantities at Pensacola NAS as of May 4- 50,700 on deck.
Boom Deployments
April 27- 2,500 feet deployed
April 28- 21,200 feet deployed
April 29- 14,100 feet deployed
April 30- 19,000 feet deployed
May 1- 18,000 feet deployed
May 2-13,000 feet deployed
May 3- 3,500 feet deployed

Actions Taken By Santa Rosa County
Emergency management staff had identified long and short term objectives, to include but not limited to:
Continue coordinating training needed for workers and volunteers to participate in clean-up & coordinate training opportunities.
Update priority list for boom requests to unified command
Request BP to establish a claims/information office in Navarre
Follow up on air, water and sediment quality baseline tests
Monitor water for oil or affected wildlife
Document local resources used
Research and track financial impacts and tourism
Prepare contingency plan for response to protect Santa Rosa resources
Monitor requests made to unified command
Santa Rosa County will watch for possible cases of contractor fraud related to the oil spill, will track and document these cases, and submit the information to state officials.
A local state of emergency was declared at 3 p.m., Friday, April 30, allowing the county to implement proactive measures as needed.
Emergency management officials continue to participate in the unified command and State of Florida Department of Emergency Management conference calls to obtain the lasted information to plan our role accordingly.
Pre-qualified debris contractors and environmental engineering consultants have been contacted and are ready to respond as required.
The EOC is activated at a level 2, or partial activation with essential staff, from 8 a.m.- 5 p.m. until further notice.
The Santa Rosa County Citizen Information Line at (850) 983-INFO or 4636 is open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. daily.
For more information www.santarosa.fl.gov/oilspill

Fraud
The Attorney General's office reported instances of fraud from companies claiming to be BP training contractors. Free volunteer training will be available through Santa Rosa County.
To report possible causes of fraud, call the Attorney General's Office fraud hotline at 1-866-966-7226.

Visitor Information
Navarre Beach and all of Santa Rosa County are open for visitors.
Due to changing conditions there is no way to know for sure when the oil could affect Navarre Beach, or for how long.
If you have concerns about reservations, please check with your management company regarding cancellation polices.
Monitor the situation at www.santarosa.fl.gov/oilspill.
Decide if you can take a "wait and see" approach rather than cancel your plans to vacation on Navarre Beach.

Volunteers
Trainings for Santa Rosa County volunteers are being coordinated. Times, locations and requirements will be announced as soon as arrangements can be confirmed with BP.
To become a part of the Santa Rosa County volunteer database for volunteer opportunities that may arise, contact the Volunteer Reception Center operated through Help Thy Neighbors in coordination with emergency management at (850) 983-5223.

NOAA Closes Commercial and Recreational Fishing in Oil-Affected Portion of Gulf of Mexico
NOAA is restricting fishing for a minimum of ten days on Sunday, May 2, in federal waters most affected by the BP oil spill, largely between Louisiana state waters at the mouth of the Mississippi River to waters off Florida's Pensacola Bay. The closure is effective immediately.
Details can be found at: http://sero.nmfs.noaa.gov/
Fishermen who wish to contact BP about a claim should call (800) 440-0858.

Clean-Up Jobs
Workforce Escarosa, Inc. will host hiring events in effort to recruit and screen applicants for an estimated 500 clean-up jobs with Advanced Employment Solutions on the following dates:
Wednesday, May 5- 9 a.m. until 1 p.m., Workforce Escarosa Pensacola One-Stop located at 3670-A North L Street
Wednesday, May 5- 9 a.m. until 1 p.m., Workforce Escarosa Century One-Stop located at 8120 North Century Blvd.
Applicants must bring proof of U.S. citizenship, a valid driver's license, and any relevant credentials. For more information, visit www.employflorida.com and search for job order numbers 9481666, 9481677, 9481703, 9481718, and 9481331.

BP Claim Line
BP has established a claim system that will allow people to begin the process to recover lost income or recoup damage related expense at (800)-440-0858.

Vessels of Opportunity (boats) program
BP is looking to contract shrimp boats, oyster boats and other vessels for hire through the Vessel of Opportunities Program to deploy boom in the Gulf of Mexico. For more information (425) 745-8017

Alternative Response Technology
To submit alternative response technology, services or products please email horizonsupport@oegllc.comThis e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it or call (281) 366-5511.

Oiled Wildlife
To report oiled wildlife, please call 1-866-557-1401 and leave a message. Messages will be checked hourly. Individuals are urged not to attempt to help injured or oiled animals, but to report any sightings to the toll free number.

Report Oil Sightings
To report oiled shoreline, please call 1-866-448-5816.

Other Contact Numbers
Transocean hotline: 832-587-8554
MI Swaco hotline: 888-318-6765
BP Investor Relations: 381-366-3123
BP family hotline: 281-36-578
BP third party contractor hotline: 281-366-5578

General Safety Information
www.santarosa.fl.gov
Please monitor your home weather radio and local media outlets for the most up-to-date information.
Your best defense in any disaster is a NOAA Weather radio.
Citizens can signup to automatically receive breaking news alerts from Santa Rosa County Emergency Management via e-mail or as a text message on their cell phone at: www.santarosa.fl.gov/emergency/publicwarning.html.

Citizen Information Line
The Santa Rosa County Citizen Information Line at (850) 983-INFO or 4636 is open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. daily.
Citizens may call (850) 983-INFO (4636) with questions.

Joy Tsubooka
Public Information Officer
Santa Rosa County
4499 Pine Forest Road
Milton, FL 32583
(850) 983-5254
(850) 393-8304 cell
www.santarosa.fl.gov
Kenny Wilder
NavarreBeachLife.com ~ Owner/Administrator
Constitutional Conservative
Florida Master Naturalist ~ Coastal Systems and Wetlands
Forum Rules and Regulations (Terms of Service)
Are You Going to Heaven?
User avatar
Kenny Wilder
Power User
Power User
Posts: 7068
Joined: Thu Aug 24, 2006 4:52 pm
Location: Navarre, Florida
Contact:

Tue May 04, 2010 11:07 pm

Paranoia, anxiety grow over Gulf Coast oil spill

By VICKI SMITH and ALLEN G. BREED (AP) – 4 hours ago

GRAND ISLE, La. — People along the Gulf Coast have spent weeks living with uncertainty, wondering where and when a huge slick of oil might come ashore, ruining their beaches — and their livelihoods.

The anxiety is so acute that some are seeing and smelling oil where there is none. And even though the dead turtles and jellyfish washing ashore along the Gulf of Mexico are clean, and scientists have yet to determine what killed them, many are just sure the flow of crude unleashed by the explosion at BP's Deepwater Horizon is the culprit.

Calm seas Tuesday helped cleanup crews working to fight the oil gushing from the well a mile below the surface, allowing them to put out more containment equipment and repair some booms damaged in rough weather over the weekend. They also hoped to again try to burn some of the oil on the water's surface, possibly Wednesday.

A Coast Guard official said forecasts showed the oil wasn't expected to come ashore until at least Thursday.

"It's a gift of a little bit of time. I'm not resting," U.S. Coast Guard Rear Adm. Mary Landry said.

Near Port Fourchon, southwest of New Orleans, workers for contractor Wild Well Control were busy welding and painting a massive containment device. BP spokesman John Curry said it would be deployed on the seabed by Thursday.

That wasn't much comfort to the hotel owners, fishing boat captains and others who rely on the ocean to make a living.

"The waiting is the hardest part. The not knowing," said Dodie Vegas, 44, who runs the Bridge Side Cabins complex in Grand Isle, a resort and recreational fishing community that's just about as far south in Louisiana as you can go. So far, two fishing rodeos have been canceled, and 10 guests have canceled their rooms.

The Deepwater Horizon exploded April 20, killing 11 workers and sending hundreds of thousands of gallons of oil a day gushing into the Gulf. While a rainbow sheen of oil has reached land in parts of Louisiana, the gooey rafts of coagulated crude have yet to come ashore in most places.

Officials couldn't confirm reports that some of it reached the delicate Chandeleur Islands off the coast of Louisiana on Tuesday. The Associated Press reported oil had come ashore at the mouth of the Mississippi last week.

While officials worked on cleanup, the long wait took its toll — on nerves and wallets.

"It's aggravating, to a point," said Frank Besson, 61, owner of Nez Coupe Souvenir & Tackle. "You got people canceling out, thinking we've got oil on the beaches, and it's not even at the mouth of the Mississippi."

Over the weekend, residents on Florida's Navarre Beach thought they saw an oily sheen in the surf. When a dead bird washed up, that only reinforced their fears.

Reporters, lifeguards and the Navarre Fire Department descended on the beach. Community officials eventually declared what washed ashore was just "a natural occurrence."


The Environmental Protection Agency stepped up air quality monitoring on the Gulf Coast after people in New Orleans and elsewhere reported a strong odor of petroleum. A throng standing on the beach in Gulfport, Miss., Saturday were convinced they could smell the slick — until someone pointed out a big diesel truck idling just 50 feet away.

When the truck left, so did the smell.

Dr. Timothy F. Jones, deputy state epidemiologist with the Tennessee Department of Health, witnessed a similar phenomenon in his own state.

In 1998, Jones investigated a case in which reports of a funny smell at a high school blossomed into a wave of nausea, dizziness, headaches and drowsiness that sent 170 people to area hospitals, shut down the school for more than two weeks and eventually cost nearly $100,000 in emergency medical care. Officials never were able to identify a physical source, viral or chemical, leading to the conclusion that the cause was most likely psychological.

"They're often associated with lots of media and lots of attention," Jones said of these events. "They often occur in populations under stress."

That certainly describes the current spill and the perennially beleaguered communities along the Gulf Coast.

Fishermen have complained bitterly about the federal decision to close a large swathe of the Gulf to commercial and sport fishing, saying it was an overreaction. Some even vowed to keep catching fish until someone arrested them.

But U.S. Sen. David Vitter said it was necessary to reassure the American public that the seafood on restaurant menus and store shelves is safe.

"We don't want hysteria to take over and hysteria to hurt the industry even more than the oil is," said Vitter, R-La.

Daryl Carpenter, president of the Louisiana Charter Boat Association, is struggling to get people to understand that three-quarters of the Gulf is still clean and open to fishing.

In Gulf Shores, Ala., the real estate firm Brett/Robinson Vacations, sent a note to those renting vacation properties that they would not be penalized for any spill-related cancellations, but urged them not to jump the gun.

"There are many questions and many `what ifs' regarding this event," the message read. "Because changes come about hourly and 30 days is a long way away, we are asking you to wait before canceling your vacation, especially those of you who are scheduled to arrive more than 30 days from today."

The missive concluded with the words: "Thank you for staying with us and enjoying our beautiful Beaches."

There are legitimate concerns, experts say. A second bird found in the slick, a brown pelican, is recovering at a bird rescue center in Louisiana. National Wildlife Federation president and CEO Larry Schweiger says there's no way to know how many birds have been oiled because the slick is so big and so far offshore.

A decade ago when Jan Grant and her husband bought their little piece of paradise on St. George Island, Fla., bound by Apalachicola Bay on one side and the Gulf on the other, they never worried that the white sand 200 yards in front of the hotel could be covered in oil. Their St. George Inn is booked full the next two weekends, and Grant is taking reservations into the summer, but travelers are already calling about the spill.

"You mentally want to push it back to the west, and then you feel guilty for doing so," Jan Grant said.

"All we're doing is holding our collective breath," echoed Stella Banta, who was taking similar calls at Coombs Inn in Apalachicola's brick-lined historic district.

Idling his 28-foot charter boat in the lee of Louisiana's pristine Chandeleur Islands, Bob Kenney looked over the gunwales to see dozens of dead baby jellyfish floating along the hull. Off in the distance, the collections of thick, reddish-brown goo looked for all the world like little islands — except that they were moving.

"There's no sense in telling me the impact until you get the oil shut off," said the 41-year-old boat captain, who has already lost a half-dozen charters from people worried about fishing in the tainted Gulf.

Amid all the speculation surrounding the spill, the one thing that seemed certain was that life would never be the same.

"You know change is a-comin' after this, bro," he said, shaking his head ruefully. "You can't keep doing this kind of stuff to Mother Ocean."

Associated Press writer Kevin McGill in New Orleans contributed to this story.
Kenny Wilder
NavarreBeachLife.com ~ Owner/Administrator
Constitutional Conservative
Florida Master Naturalist ~ Coastal Systems and Wetlands
Forum Rules and Regulations (Terms of Service)
Are You Going to Heaven?
gailjean
Power User
Power User
Posts: 1172
Joined: Mon Sep 25, 2006 1:10 pm

Wed May 05, 2010 6:12 am

good article - thanks for sharing, kenny.
User avatar
Kenny Wilder
Power User
Power User
Posts: 7068
Joined: Thu Aug 24, 2006 4:52 pm
Location: Navarre, Florida
Contact:

Wed May 05, 2010 11:06 am

National Parks Rimming the Gulf Coast Watching, Waiting, and Preparing For Oil Slick

The link below from the National Park Service shows what the tar balls may look like if they ever come ashore at Navarre Beach. To date the tar balls have not arrived. Let's pray that they never come our way.

http://www.nationalparkstraveler.com/20 ... -slick5814
Kenny Wilder
NavarreBeachLife.com ~ Owner/Administrator
Constitutional Conservative
Florida Master Naturalist ~ Coastal Systems and Wetlands
Forum Rules and Regulations (Terms of Service)
Are You Going to Heaven?
User avatar
Kenny Wilder
Power User
Power User
Posts: 7068
Joined: Thu Aug 24, 2006 4:52 pm
Location: Navarre, Florida
Contact:

Wed May 05, 2010 1:47 pm

Navarre mirage: Beachgoers see oil

Panic begins to set in for many as slick lingers off shore

Pensacola News Journal
Louis Cooper • lcooper@pnj.com • May 5, 2010


After days of rain, wind and overcast skies, the weather broke Tuesday at Navarre Beach. Sunbeams out-numbered clouds, and large waves rolled in to the sugar white beaches, carrying surfers in tow.

"The water is more clear today than it has been all week," said Carson Jones, 25, a surfer and native of Navarre who took advantage of the wave action. "The water is good."

He added an ominous addendum: "The water didn't smell."

That's because a chemical, gasoline-like smell is one of the tell-tale signs beachgoers have been alerted to in anticipation of the growing oil slick looming less than 100 miles of the coast of Northwest Florida.

Jones, who also works as a lifeguard at Navarre Beach, said sunbathers are jittery about the spill, seeing oil where there isn't any — yet.

"Lots of people are freaking out about it," he said. "When there's big surf, there's a brown foam on the water. All week, everybody thought that was the oil showing up, but it's not. That's just how it gets."


Wayne Baker first visited Navarre Beach 20 years ago, when he brought his wife there on their honeymoon. Four years ago, he moved to Milton from Mississippi. He works in Navarre and frequently fishes for pompano and redfish from the shore at Navarre Beach.

He fears the oil looming off the coast will be "catastrophic."

"I fish two or three times a week. I love this beach. I am very concerned," said Baker, 57. "It will ruin everything for it. It's going to affect all our hotels, all our restaurants."

Melissa Parker, 46, a Navarre resident who came out to the beach Tuesday morning said rumors are circulating that the oil is already here.

"I come here to commune with a higher power. For me, this is holy ground. If we don't save this, we won't have anything left," Parker said. "This oil was drilled off the coast of Louisiana and it can damage our shores. That's not far enough away.

"All the people who said something like this couldn't happen — well, of course, it could happen."

Esther Phillips, 52, is visiting Navarre Beach with family from Arkansas this week. They knew the oil slick was approaching when they planned their trip.

"We were just hoping we'd get here without seeing it," she said. "I think it would ruin this white sand. I'd hate to see it hit here."

Larry Leister, 54, a resident of Navarre, walked out to the beach Tuesday morning just to make sure everything was still OK. He works on an offshore rig.

"Something like this surprises me because of all the safeguards they have," Leister said. "This is just something freaky that happened. We always get stuff that happens, but nothing like this. I've never seen or heard of anything like this."
Kenny Wilder
NavarreBeachLife.com ~ Owner/Administrator
Constitutional Conservative
Florida Master Naturalist ~ Coastal Systems and Wetlands
Forum Rules and Regulations (Terms of Service)
Are You Going to Heaven?
User avatar
Kenny Wilder
Power User
Power User
Posts: 7068
Joined: Thu Aug 24, 2006 4:52 pm
Location: Navarre, Florida
Contact:

Wed May 05, 2010 2:17 pm

BREAKING NEWS FROM SANTA ROSA COUNTY ABOUT NAVARRE BEACH

Posted: Wednesday, May 05, 2010 at 2:13 PM

Information Only


Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Update #6 is now available at www.santarosa.fl.gov/oilspill.
Kenny Wilder
NavarreBeachLife.com ~ Owner/Administrator
Constitutional Conservative
Florida Master Naturalist ~ Coastal Systems and Wetlands
Forum Rules and Regulations (Terms of Service)
Are You Going to Heaven?
User avatar
Kenny Wilder
Power User
Power User
Posts: 7068
Joined: Thu Aug 24, 2006 4:52 pm
Location: Navarre, Florida
Contact:

Thu May 06, 2010 7:20 am

False alarms keep officials busy

Pensacola News Journal
May 6, 2010


-- Calls about tar balls arriving on Navarre Beach did not pan out. Photos that were submitted showed hardpan, a naturally occurring organic material formed over thousands of years.

-- The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service received numerous reports of a migratory bird "fall-out" near Gulf Breeze. The term refers to live birds that drop down in big numbers along their migratory path, usually from natural exhaustion. This is a common event that occurs annually, Wildlife Service biologists said.

-- Along Gulf-front beaches are small, basically clear and somewhat "pointy" plankton, known as the Pteropod or sea butterfly. It's a naturally occurring larval snail that is unrelated to the oil. Although they are fairly sharp and may stick to your fingers or feet, they do not pose a threat to people.


Miller's oil spill video on YouTube

U.S. Rep. Jeff Miller, R-Chumuckla, invites constituents to join him on the social networking site YouTube.com.

"We've got exclusive video from the cleanup and containment efforts in the Gulf of Mexico." Miller said in a news release. "We will continue to use this as one of the many tools to deliver accurate and up-to-date information on the Deepwater Horizon oil spill."

YouTube users can subscribe to Miller's channel and receive updates at www.youtube.com/user/RepJeffMiller.

4,000 applications for cleanup jobs
Workforce Escarosa received about 4,000 applications for an oil spill cleanup crew during recruiting events in Pensacola, Milton and Century.

The applications will be sent to the Texas-based Advanced Employment Solutions for a final decision.

Belinda Todd of Workforce Escarosa said the company may decide to hire more than the originally planned 500 employees.

"With the economy we have right now, being able to put our local people to work would be fantastic," she said.

Advanced Employment will hire general laborers, crew leaders, site supervisors, site safety representatives and lead safety representatives. Pay varies from $10 to $18 per hour.

The duration of the jobs will depend upon the amount of damage, but the process probably will take three to 18 months.

Area drinking water remains safe

Emerald Coast Utilities Authority's drinking-water supply is naturally protected from contamination related to surface waters in the Gulf of Mexico and local bays and bayous.

"The ECUA has 32 wells distributed throughout Escambia County that draw water from the Sand-and-Gravel Aquifer, at depths ranging from 160 to 450 feet," said Steve Sorrell, ECUA executive director.

"The water source is totally groundwater and has no connection with the Gulf of Mexico, local bays, or river waters."

BP's sets up a local presence

-- BP has set up a local office to handle its operations and volunteer support at the Chappie James Building, 160 W. Government St., Pensacola.

-- BP is handling spill-related claims out of a central claims office in Houston. The number is (800) 440-0858.

BP issued phone numbers for the following inquiries:

-- To report oiled wildlife: Call (866) 557-1401 and leave a message. Messages will be checked hourly.

--- To discuss spill-related damage or claims: Call (800) 440-0858.

-- To report oil on shoreline or request volunteer information: Call (866) 448-5816 or e-mail deepwaterhorizon response@hotmail.com.

-- BP wants to contract shrimp boats, oyster boats and other vessels for hire through the Vessel of Opportunities Program to deploy booms in the Gulf of Mexico. For more information, call (425) 745-8017.

-- To submit alternative response technology, services or products, e-mail horizonsupport@oegllc.com or call (281) 366-5511.

Got an idea to help with spill cleanup?

Escambia County officials have set up a mechanism for anyone with alternative response techniques, services, product suggestions or ideas on handling the oil cleanup. If you have such a suggestion, contact Gregory Allen at 478-9844 or gsallen@pbsj.com. Allen is a consultant for Escambia County.

Got questions?

• The Escambia County citizen information phone number is (850) 471-6600.

• The Santa Rosa County citizen information phone number is (850) 983-INFO or 4636.

-- Florida Emergency Information Line is (800) 342-3557.
Kenny Wilder
NavarreBeachLife.com ~ Owner/Administrator
Constitutional Conservative
Florida Master Naturalist ~ Coastal Systems and Wetlands
Forum Rules and Regulations (Terms of Service)
Are You Going to Heaven?
User avatar
Kenny Wilder
Power User
Power User
Posts: 7068
Joined: Thu Aug 24, 2006 4:52 pm
Location: Navarre, Florida
Contact:

Thu May 06, 2010 12:47 pm

Image

BP Plans to Lower Containment Dome to Seafloor Today

Bloomberg
May 06, 2010, 11:49 AM EDT
By Kari Lundgren


May 6 (Bloomberg) -- BP Plc, battling an oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, plans to lower a containment dome to the seabed today to collect crude spewing from a damaged well as the slick threatened to slow shipping at the largest U.S. commodity port.

The 40-foot-tall steel box weighs about 100 tons and will be used as part of an effort to seal two remaining leaks, the London-based company said in a statement. One of three leaks was contained yesterday after crews successfully closed a valve installed May 4.

Oil has been gushing at an estimated rate of 5,000 barrels a day from the well, roughly 40 miles (64 kilometers) off the southeastern tip of Louisiana. The BP-leased Deepwater Horizon rig exploded April 20 and sank two days later, killing 11 workers and causing oil leaks about 5,000 feet (1,524 meters) below the sea surface.

“If they can put these funnels over the leaks and control them it will ease back on the growth of the slick,” Panmure Gordon analyst Peter Hitchens said today in a telephone interview. “If this doesn’t work, the question is what can they do next?”

Oil leaking from the well drifted within 1.5 miles of the buoy marking the entrance to Southwest Pass, the main approach to the Mississippi River, the largest shipping route for U.S. commodities, Wayne Mumphrey, secretary treasurer of the Port of New Orleans, said yesterday in an interview.

Scrubbing Ships

All ships entering the port must be decontaminated once oil passes the buoy, said Mumphrey. Scrubbing oil from each ship may take 12 hours, causing a backup into the Gulf, he said. Arriving ships are being inspected for oil on the hull and there were no reports of any needing cleaning this morning, Coast Guard Petty Officer Connie Terrell said today in an interview.

BP has dropped 13 percent since the explosion, wiping about 15 billion pounds off the value of the company. Shares rose 2 pence, or 0.4 percent, to 567 pence in London today.

Hitchens said the shares have “more than reacted” to the disaster. He raised his rating to “buy” from “sell” yesterday.

The underwater containment structure on the well should be working by May 10 and will try to capture 85 percent of the oil and pipe it to a ship on the surface, BP’s Chief Operating Officer of Exploration and Production Doug Suttles said yesterday. The technology has never been tried in such deep water.

Clogging Pipes

Water temperatures of about 42 degrees Fahrenheit (6 degrees Celsius) and pressures of 2,300 pounds per square inch may make it difficult to prevent clogging in the pipes, NCB Stockbrokers Ltd. analyst Peter Hutton said in a note to investors today.

BP plans to circulate warm surface water and antifreeze around the pipe to prevent this, Dave Clarkson, BP’s project manager for the underwater containment plan, said yesterday.

“The degree to which they will be successful is hard to predict,” Satish Nagarajaiah, a professor of civil and environmental engineering at Rice University in Houston, said yesterday in an interview. “The opening they have for the pipe is rectangular and the pipe is circular, so they are going to have some leakage.”

A relief well to block off the flow of oil from the reservoir was begun on May 2 and is expected to take about three months to complete, BP said today. Twelve flights have distributed 34,000 gallons of dispersant and over 100 miles of boom has been deployed, the company said. BP is also using remote-controlled vehicles to spray detergent-like dispersant near the sea floor.

Florida, Mississippi

Oil from the slick may approach Gulf Islands National Seashore off the coast of Florida and Mississippi on May 9 or May 10, the National Park Service said yesterday on its website.

A civilian version of the Cold War U-2 spy plane, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s ER-2, will survey the shoreline and slick with high-resolution and infrared cameras to improve forecasting of the spill’s path, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said yesterday in a statement. NASA satellites also will be used.

The U.S. Justice Department has asked the rig’s owner Transocean Ltd. to preserve evidence from the April 20 explosion, as analysts said the resulting oil pollution is a worse threat to the industry than the slick created by the 1989 Exxon Valdez spill.

Valdez Spill

The Valdez spilled about 260,000 barrels of crude oil after grounding. At the 5,000-barrel-a-day spillage rate estimated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, BP’s well will exceed that volume next month.

“Companies will have to rethink back-up procedures, but the simple fact of the matter is the world doesn’t have much choice,” said Peter King, a petroleum engineering professor at Imperial College London who worked for BP for 17 years. “We have discovered most of the oil fields we are likely to find in easy places.”

Should BP’s custom-built containment structure work “they are going to start thinking about this as a backup on major drilling operations because of this very accident,” Nagarajaiah said. “All procedures will be revisited.”
Kenny Wilder
NavarreBeachLife.com ~ Owner/Administrator
Constitutional Conservative
Florida Master Naturalist ~ Coastal Systems and Wetlands
Forum Rules and Regulations (Terms of Service)
Are You Going to Heaven?
User avatar
Kenny Wilder
Power User
Power User
Posts: 7068
Joined: Thu Aug 24, 2006 4:52 pm
Location: Navarre, Florida
Contact:

Thu May 06, 2010 8:59 pm

Deepwater Horizon Incident Update #7

Situation Update• Currently, there are no impacts to the state projected in the next 72 hours. The loop current is far south of the oil and there is no imminent threat that the oil will be picked up by the loop current. However, Florida continues to make preparations to safeguard the state’s shoreline.
• A called meeting of the Santa Rosa County Board of Commissioners to discuss the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill response is scheduled for Friday, May 7 at 1:30 p.m. in the board meeting room located at 6495 Caroline Street in Milton.
• Santa Rosa’s Deepwater Horizon Q&A has been updated and can be found at www.santarosa.fl.gov/oilspill.
• A seafood consumption FAQ from the UF Florida Seas Grant college Program has been posted at www.santarosa.fl.gov/oilspill.
• The Volunteer Reception Center operated through Help Thy Neighbors is collecting items for wildlife cleanup including:
o baby blankets
o towels
o heating pads (with out auto shut off if possible)
o large Rubbermaid containers with lids
o heating lamps, Rubbermaid troughs (can be purchased at Tractor Supply in Crestview or online)
o large backyard portable pools
For more information and drop off locations, call Help Thy Neighbors at (850) 983-5223.
• A fact sheet on the types of coastal habitats found in Santa Rosa County, how oil might behave in each habitat, and response considerations is available at www.santarosa.fl.gov/oilspill.
• Individuals concerned about air quality issues can view an up-to-date map with pollutant concentrations at www.santarosa.fl.gov/oilspill or www.airnow.gov, or they can report suspected changes in air quality at http://www.epa.gov/bpspill/.

Santa Rosa County Booming Information from BP
• The additional booming sites proposed for Santa Rosa County were approved by unified command on May 5. This includes:
o 3-Mile Bridge
o Garcon Point Bridge
o Bob Sikes Bridge
o I-10 Bridge
o Zamarra Canal, Gulf Breeze
o Woodland Bayou, Gulf Breeze
o Hoffman Bayou, Gulf Breeze
o Deadman’s Restoration Project, Gulf Breeze
• Boom placed Tuesday, May 5:
o Aquatic Preserve Yellow River (site # PEN12)- 1,500 feet
o Mullato Bayou (site # PEN45)- 5,000 feet
o East Bay Sea Grass (site # PEN22)- 7,000 feet
o Indian Bayou Oyster Bar (site # PEN29)- 13,500
• Today’s goal was to place an additional 14,7000 feet of boom at:
o Aquatic Preserve Yellow River (site # PEN12)- 2,5000
o Central Oyster Bed (site # PEN21)- 3,000 feet
o Red Fish Cove Oyster Reef (site # PEN19)- 3,500
o White Point Oyster Bay (site # PEN36)- 4,000 feet
o Weaver River (site # PEN42)- 2,700 feet
• Boom quantities at Pensacola NAS as of May 5- 20,000 on deck, 60,000 on order for May 6
• Boom Deployments
o April 27- 2,500 feet deployed
o April 28- 21,200 feet deployed
o April 29- 14,100 feet deployed
o April 30- 19,000 feet deployed
o May 1- 18,000 feet deployed
o May 2- 13,000 feet deployed
o May 3- 3,500 feet deployed
o May 4- 26,900 feet deployed
o May 5- 27,000 feet deployed
• Maps, including overall locations and a priority listing, of the U.S. Coast Guard’s booming strategy are available online at www.santarosa.fl.gov/oilspill.

Actions Taken By Santa Rosa County
• A called meeting of the Santa Rosa County Board of Commissioners to discuss the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill response is scheduled for Friday, May 7 at 1:30 p.m. in the board meeting room located at 6495 Caroline Street in Milton.
• The County has retained a consulting team to evaluate shoreline protection and shoreline restoration methodologies. These systems include technologies ranging from containment booms, vacuum systems, and various forms of absorbents.
• Midway Fire Department will teach a 4-hour Hazmat training to Santa Rosa County staff, Navarre and Pace CERT teams, and the Medical Reserve Corps. To join CERT or MRC, please contact Daniel Hahn at (850) 983-5360.
• Established a process for reviewing protection requests.
• Emergency management staff has identified long and short term objectives, to include but not limited to:
o Continue coordinating training needed for workers and volunteers to participate in clean-up & coordinate training opportunities.
o Update priority list for boom requests to unified command
o Request BP to establish a claims/information office in Navarre, which was denied.
o Follow up on air, water and sediment quality baseline tests
o Monitor water for oil or affected wildlife
o Document local resources used
o Research and track financial impacts and tourism
o Prepare contingency plan for response to protect Santa Rosa resources
o Monitor requests made to unified command
• Santa Rosa County is working with professional animal service organizations to coordinate response activities for animals affected by any oil on our coast.
• A local state of emergency was declared at 3 p.m., Friday, April 30, allowing the county to implement proactive measures as needed.
• Emergency management officials continue to participate in the unified command and State of Florida Department of Emergency Management conference calls to obtain the lasted information to plan our role accordingly.
• Pre-qualified debris contractors and environmental engineering consultants have been contacted and are ready to respond as required.
• The EOC is activated at a level 2, or partial activation with essential staff, from 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. until further notice.

BP Claims
• All claimants will be directed to a hotline (1-800-440-0858) that is manned by the catastrophic loss division of ESIS specializing in oil spill claims
• Payments will be made to address immediate issues associated with property damage or loss of income due to the oil spill
• BP believes that it is appropriate to provide interim payments to claimants who are not receiving ordinary income while the cleanup is underway
• Within 48 hours of receiving supporting documentation (e.g. tax return) the claim will be evaluated and the claimant will be notified of an advance payment for the claim
• The equivalent of 1 month’s income will be paid and these payments will continue until they are able to return to work or their overall claim is resolved.
• BP claims can be handled via phone or in person. Bills will be paid or reimbursed.
• If a claim is rejected the person will be notified in writing of non-payment
• Claims are currently being paid
• A link to information on some of the types of claims available and who can submit each claim is available at www.santarosa.fl.gov/oilspill or directly at www.uscg.mil/npfc/Claims/default.asp#types_of_claims.

Department of Financial Services• Florida CFO Alex Sink today announced that her Department of Financial Services’ toll-free Consumer Help Line, at 1-877-My-FL-CFO (1-877-693-5236), is prepared to assist business owners impacted by the growing oil spill in the Gulf. Specialists are available from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, and information is also available at www.MyFloridaCFO.com.
• Insurance specialists on the Helpline can answers questions about the claim filing process as it becomes available, but claims for damage or lost income should be filed with British Petroleum (BP) at 1-800-440-0858.
• CFO Sink provided the following tips for businesses:
o First: Take detailed records of cancelled reservations. News reports suggest that many condominium owners, hotels and restaurants are already having increased cancellations, and it’s important that when these cancellations occur, the canceling party is questioned whether the cause is because of the oil spill. If the answer is yes, keep a record of the person’s name and contact information, and also the revenues lost as a result of the cancellation.
o Second: Calculate estimated losses for a six-week period and be able to provide records, sales receipts and documentation to support such a claim. A good idea would be to compare business now to a five-year average of revenues between May and June, which can offer insight as to the damages incurred.
o Third: Make a detailed list of assets – including non-structural -- and include appropriate records to support the list. For example: if your member’s hotel or restaurant is within walking distance to the beach and that beach has oil reach its shores, the business’ assets are damaged even though there is no physical damage to the structure, and it is important to record this depreciation.
o Be wary of insurance settlement scams. -- For businesses who may have already begun the claims filing process with BP, first, make sure you are dealing with authorized representatives from BP and not scam artists; and be careful not to sign waivers of liability too quickly without getting adequate legal and financial counsel.

Community Meetings
• The link to recordings of the May 3 community meetings has been repaired.
• Questions asked by attendees at yesterday’s meeting are being complied and will be sent to BP for follow up.
• Future community meetings will be announced as they are scheduled.
• Santa Rosa County officials and emergency management staff are available to speak to groups, please contact 983-5360 for more details.


Training for Wildlife Recovery & Rehabilitation Paraprofessionals
• The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with Tri-State Bird Rescue & Research, a BP contractor, to provide assistance to oiled wildlife. The service recognizes Tri-State's expertise in wildlife oil spill response, and while many wildlife organizations and individuals have expressed interest in providing their assistance, all rehabilitation efforts must be coordinated through the service and Tri-State. Coordination is vitally important for recovery and research efforts, and specific safety and other requirements must be met before anyone will be allowed on-site for any participation. If you already have wildlife training, call BP at 1-866-557-1401.
• Computer based training for wildlife recovery and rehabilitation paraprofessionals is available online at https://www2.virtualtrainingassistant.c ... rner~cmenu
• Go to "I'm a New Student" where a page will pop up for you to self-register. Keep your log in and password info:
o There are 4 lesson modules in the training
o The first lesson is an attachment that determines if you are a qualified wildlife recovery paraprofessional. Should you not meet the qualifications listed, you will not be allowed to move further into the training
o The second lesson is the training CBT itself.
o The third lesson is the test (CBT Exam); you will need to score 80% on the test and will have three chances to pass.
o The fourth lesson is the certificate that you should print and bring with you to the rehabilitation site where you will be working.

Volunteers• Trainings for Santa Rosa County volunteers are being coordinated. Times, locations and requirements will be announced as soon as arrangements can be confirmed with BP.
• To become a part of the Santa Rosa County volunteer database for volunteer opportunities that may arise, contact the Volunteer Reception Center operated through Help Thy Neighbors in coordination with emergency management at (850) 983-5223.
• The Santa Rosa County Health Department recommends volunteers follow these safety tips:
o Ensure that water is available for participants and encourage regular consumption even when they may not be thirsty.
o Participants should be encouraged to wear sunscreen (SPF 30 at least) and reapply periodically.
o Hats, sunglasses, and other appropriate clothing should be worn.
o Take precautions to avoid insect bites, snake bites, poisonous plants, jellyfish stings and sting ray injuries.

NOAA Closes Commercial and Recreational Fishing in Oil-Affected Portion of Gulf of Mexico
• NOAA is restricting fishing for a minimum of ten days on Sunday, May 2, in federal waters most affected by the BP oil spill, largely between Louisiana state waters at the mouth of the Mississippi River to waters off Florida’s Pensacola Bay. The closure is effective immediately.
• Details can be found at: http://sero.nmfs.noaa.gov/
• Fishermen who wish to contact BP about a claim should call (800) 440-0858.

Fraud
To report possible causes of fraud, call the Attorney General's Office fraud hotline at 1-866-966-7226

Vessels of Opportunity (boats) program• BP is looking to contract shrimp boats, oyster boats and other vessels for hire through the Vessel of Opportunities Program to deploy boom in the Gulf of Mexico. For more information (425) 745-8017

Alternative Response Technology
• To submit alternative response technology, services or products please email horizonsupport@oegllc.com or call (281) 366-5511.


Florida Emergency Information Line• The Florida Emergency Information Line is available as link to informational resources regarding the Deepwater Horizon Response: (800) 342-3557.

Mobile Area Contingency Plan
To view the Coast Guard Sector Mobile Area Contingency Plan, visit http://ocean.floridamarine.org/ACP/MOBA ... tHere.html

Health-Related Concerns
• Poison control centers in the gulf region are available to take any and all health-related calls related to the Gulf of Mexico oil spill. If you or a loved one is worried about health issues related to the Gulf spill, please call your local poison control center at (800) 222-1222.
• Individuals with an air quality question or concern should contact the Environmental Protection Agency Region 4 National Response Center at 1-800-424-8802.

Oiled Wildlife
• To report oiled wildlife, please call 1-866-557-1401 and leave a message. Messages will be checked hourly. Individuals are urged not to attempt to help injured or oiled animals, but to report any sightings to the toll free number.

Report Oil Sightings• To report oiled shoreline, please call 1-866-448-5816.

Other Contact Numbers
• Transocean hotline: 832-587-8554
• MI Swaco hotline: 888-318-6765
• BP Investor Relations: 381-366-3123
• BP family hotline: 281-36-578
• BP third party contractor hotline: 281-366-5578

General Safety Information
www.santarosa.fl.gov
• Please monitor your home weather radio and local media outlets for the most up-to-date information.
• Your best defense in any disaster is a NOAA Weather radio.
• Citizens can signup to automatically receive breaking news alerts from Santa Rosa County Emergency Management via e-mail or as a text message on their cell phone at: www.santarosa.fl.gov/emergency/publicwarning.html.

Citizen Information Line• The Santa Rosa County Citizen Information Line at (850) 983-INFO or 4636 is open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. daily.
###

Joy Tsubooka
Public Information Officer
Santa Rosa County
4499 Pine Forest Road
Milton, FL 32583
(850) 983-5254
(850) 393-8304 cell
www.santarosa.fl.gov
Kenny Wilder
NavarreBeachLife.com ~ Owner/Administrator
Constitutional Conservative
Florida Master Naturalist ~ Coastal Systems and Wetlands
Forum Rules and Regulations (Terms of Service)
Are You Going to Heaven?
User avatar
Kenny Wilder
Power User
Power User
Posts: 7068
Joined: Thu Aug 24, 2006 4:52 pm
Location: Navarre, Florida
Contact:

Thu May 06, 2010 9:16 pm

Deepwater Horizon Incident Q&A

Updated May 6

Is the oil spill going to affect Santa Rosa County?
At this time, the oil spill is not expected to impact our area in the next 72 hours. However, shifting weather conditions may change that. We also do not know what the exact impacts will be to Santa Rosa County. At the minimum, we do expect to see some amount of tarballs, or dark-colored pieces of oil on the beach. An odor in the coastal areas may also be possible.

How long will the spill threaten our area?
When and how long Santa Rosa may be impacted is unknown due to the uncertainty of weather conditions, the total amount of oil released from the site, and when the spill is contained at the accident site.

Will evacuations be ordered?
This type of incident should not require an evacuation.

Is Navarre Beach going to be closed?
There are no plans for local government to close the beach.

I have vacation plans on Navarre Beach, what should I do?
Navarre Beach is currently open and no visible effects of the oil spill are currently being seen. Due to changing conditions there is no way to know for sure when the oil could affect Navarre Beach, or for how long.
If you have concerns about reservations, please check with your management company regarding cancellation policies. We suggest that if possible, take a “wait and see” approach rather than cancel your plans to vacation on Navarre Beach. You can monitor the situation at www.santarosa.fl.gov/oilspill.

Where are booms going to be placed?
In accordance with the Area Contingency Plan the Coast Guard created, environmentally sensitive areas in the bay and estuaries are the top priority. Several other booming locations, including 3-Mile Bridge, Garcon Point Bridge, Bob Sikes Bridge, I-10 Bridge, Zamarra Canal, Woodland Bayou, Hoffman Bayou, Deadman’s Restoration Project, were requested by Santa Rosa County and were approved for placement by unified command. Links to boom maps are located at http://www.santarosa.fl.gov/oilspill.

Where can I get my own booms to put out?
It is not recommended at this time that residents boom their own property as it may be counterproductive to the U.S. Coast Guard’s contingency plan and actually cause greater damage.

How will our habitat and wildlife be affected?
The habitats with the highest sensitivity are marshes, estuaries, sheltered tidal flats, and shallow sub-tidal areas. The lowest is sandy beach because it is the easiest to clean, as both manual and heavy equipment may be used. The oil condition that is expected to impact shorelines is predicted to be a gel or paste-like emulsion and of tarball consistency, stranding in a discontinuous and patchy manner. The oil may be brown, sticky and possibly emitting a sheen associated with emulsified oil. Due to the low aromatic content, the acute toxicity is low relative to fresher oil. It will stick to emergent and aquatic vegetation, birds, fur-bearing mammals and reptiles.

The effect on wildlife can include: smothering of invertebrates, ingestion, loss of ability to thermoregulate, eye and mucus membrane irritation, and transport of oil through marshes by animals. The biodegradation is slow, which could lead to chronic effects on fish, invertebrates, and wildlife. The toxicity or harmful effects on the wildlife are dependent upon:

mixture and types of chemicals that make up the oil or are used to clean up the oil,

amount of exposure (dose for internal exposures or time for external exposures),

route of exposure (inhaled, ingested, absorbed, or external), and

Biomedical risk factors of the animal (age, sex, reproductive stage, and health status). For turtles this will include differing impacts and vulnerabilities at the different life stages such as eggs, post-hatchlings, juveniles

My property has been damaged or I have lost income due to the oil spill. How do I make a claim?
All claimants will be directed to a hotline (1-800-440-0858) that is manned by the catastrophic loss division of ESIS specializing in oil spill claims. Santa Rosa County encourages citizens and businesses with coastal property to document the condition of their property now, before any effects are seen. This includes shoreline, structures, seawalls, docks, lifts, boats and anything that may come in contact with the oiled water.
BP has released the following claim information:

Payments will be made to address immediate issues associated with property damage or loss of income due to the oil spill

BP believes that it is appropriate to provide interim payments to claimants who are not receiving ordinary income while the cleanup is underway

Within 48 hours of receiving supporting documentation (e.g. tax return) the claim will be evaluated and the claimant will be notified of an advance payment for the claim

The equivalent of 1 month’s income will be paid and these payments will continue until they are able to return to work or their overall claim is resolved.

BP claims can be handled via phone or in person. Bills will be paid or reimbursed.

If a claim is rejected the person will be notified in writing of non-payment

Claims are currently being paid

A link to information on some of the types of claims available and who can submit each claim is available at www.santarosa.fl.gov/oilspill or directly at www.uscg.mil/npfc/Claims/default.asp#types_of_claims.
The Florida Department of Financial Services’ toll-free Consumer Help Line, at 1-877-My-FL-CFO (1-877-693-5236), is also prepared to assist business owners impacted by the growing oil spill in the Gulf. Specialists are available from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, and information is also available at www.MyFloridaCFO.com. Insurance specialists on the Helpline can answers questions about the claim filing process as it becomes available, but claims for damage or lost income should be filed with British Petroleum (BP) at 1-800-440-0858.

What actions do I need to take to keep my family safe?
At this time, no protective action is needed. We ask that you monitor our local media outlets daily for the latest information from county officials on any action you may or may not need to take. You can also visit our Website at www.santarosa.fl.gov/oilspill.

Precautions for Affected Areas
When our area starts to see the effects of the oil spill, please follow these simple safety tips:

Avoid entering areas where oil can be seen or smelled. If you see or smell oil, leave the area right away.

Avoid direct skin contact with oil, oil-contaminated water and sediments.

Do not swim or ski in areas affected by the oil spill, and if you travel through the area by boat, take precautions when hoisting the boat anchor. If you get oil on your skin, wash it off immediately with soap and water.

Do not fish in the oil spill-affected waters.

Do not harvest and eat dead fish, fish with oily residue or fish that have a petroleum odor.

Do not drive your boat through slicks or sheens.

Young children, pregnant women, people with compromised immune systems, and individuals with underlying respiratory conditions should avoid the area.

Restrict pets from entering oil-contaminated areas.

Look for updated opportunities for spill clean-up training or work with group leaders who have received proper personal protection training.

Is seafood from Florida’s Gulf coast safe to eat?
All seafood sold in Florida retail stores, supermarkets and restaurants will remain safe to consume prior to and during any potential exposure to contamination from the pending oil spill. Traditional food safety controls have been supplemented with additional emergency response plans by the pertinent federal, state and county authorities. Control measures include monitoring of the harvest waters and products, cautionary closures of certain waters and fisheries, analytical and sensory monitoring of products, and public advisories. Likewise, seafood will be provided from many areas that are not subject to potential exposure to the oil spill.

Should I eat seafood that I catch for myself and family?
In the event of any contamination, state authorities will try to restrict local harvest and recreational activities to coastal waters that are declared open and approved. Public advisories will be posted and broadcast through many agencies, radio stations and televised news. Progressive updates and contact information will be posted on various websites such as the site maintained by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, (http://www.dep.state.fl.us/deepwaterhorizon/default.htm.)
Recreational fishermen should avoid areas with obvious signs of oil contamination on the surface of the water, or on the neighboring beaches and vegetation. Also, it is not prudent to eat fish that look distressed, are behaving in a strange manner, or have been found dead. The contaminants associated with an oil spill can be detected with simple sensory checks for odors. Any fish or seafood with an oily, fuel-like odor, either when raw or cooked, should not be eaten, and should be reported to authorities.

Will local seafood be contaminated by the oil spill?
There is no contamination at this time, but predictions suggest the leaking oil could accumulate and reach the Florida coasts. If exposed to the various types of chemicals associated with the oil spill, certain coastal marine animals can be killed or contaminated. The amount of exposure will vary depending on the type of oil present and type of seafood involved. Previous experience from other oil spills around the world indicate that some of the more mobile species can detect and avoid the contaminants, but other slower, burrowing and bottom-dwelling species are more susceptible to exposure. Exposure can be directly from the water, through the aquatic food chain, and/or from contaminated sediments.

What are potential health impacts residents might face?
Air Quality
Some individuals are more susceptible to change in air quality due to medical conditions. Anyone who is concerned about change in air quality due to this event should contact their primary health care provider, as each of us has a unique health profile.
• As with wildfires and other events that increase particulate matter in the air, consider staying inside, in an air-conditioned room and change the air-conditioner filter to ensure peak performance.
Page 4 of 6

Avoid strenuous activities outside.

If you have difficulty breathing, shortness of breath or other serious symptoms, seek immediate medical attention

Individuals with an air quality question or concern should contact the Environmental Protection Agency Region 4 National Response Center at 1-800-424-8802.
Contact with Tarballs
For most people, an occasional brief contact with a small amount of oil, while not recommended, will do no harm. However, some people are especially sensitive to chemicals, including the hydrocarbons found in crude oil and petroleum products. They may have an allergic reaction or develop rashes even from brief contact with oil. In general, we recommend that contact with oil be avoided. If contact occurs, wash the area with soap and water, baby oil, or a widely used, safe cleaning compound such as cleaning paste sold at auto parts stores. Avoid using solvents, gasoline, kerosene, diesel fuel, or similar products on the skin. These products, when applied to the skin, present a greater health hazard than the smeared tarball itself.

Who are the lead responders in the Deepwater Horizon spill?
The lead response agencies are the U.S. Coast Guard, the Minerals Management Service and BP.

Who is paying for the current response efforts?
BP, the responsible party, is required to fund the cost of the response and cleanup operations. The Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund, established after the Exxon Valdez incident, is also available to fund cleanups, if needed.

What is a Unified Command?
The Unified Command is a structure that brings together the "Incident Commanders" of all major organizations involved in the incident in order to coordinate an effective response while at the same time carrying out their own jurisdictional responsibilities. The UC links the organizations responding to the incident and provides a forum for these entities to make consensus decisions. Under the UC, the various jurisdictions and/or agencies and non-government responders may blend together throughout the operation to create an integrated response team.

The UC is responsible for overall management of the incident. The UC directs incident activities, including development and implementation of overall objectives and strategies, and approves ordering and releasing of resources. Members of the UC work together to develop a common set of incident objectives and strategies, share information, maximize the use of available resources, and enhance the efficiency of the individual response organizations.

The unified area command for this incident is located in Robert, Louisiana. The regional response is divided up into five response areas based on the U.S. Coast Guard’s jurisdictional lines. Our regional command center is located in Mobile, Alabama and reports to the UC in Louisiana. This does not mean the response is focusing on Alabama, that is just the physical location of the command center.

What role does Santa Rosa County play in the response?
Our role is to support the unified command. As discussed earlier, the UC ensures that we are able to maximize the use of available resources and enhance the efficiency of the response locally and as a whole. That does not mean we are not an active participant in any response effort. We know our county, our strengths and weaknesses, and as a member of the UC we will be a part of the decision making process and response if the oil spill affects our area.

While it may seem like local counties are not reacting, that is far from the case. Unlike a hurricane where the county is the lead or first response organization, and calls on the state and then the federal government for any assistance with resources needed, this oil spill requires a large regional response and works in the reverse- with a private/federal, state, and local approach. BP and the federal government have the expertise and resources to lead this response which we may not have on the local level.

What is Santa Rosa County doing to prepare?
We are very concerned about the affects of the spill to our area and the impact to our residents and are working daily to respond. Santa Rosa County’s official situational reports and incident action plans submitted to the state are posted on www.santarosa.fl.gov/oilspill and are updated daily.

What if I come in contact with injured wildlife?
To report oiled wildlife, please call 1-866-557-1401 and leave a message. Messages will be checked hourly. Individuals are urged not to attempt to help injured or oiled animals, but to report any sightings to the toll free number.

How do I report spill related damage?
To discuss spill related damage, please call 1-800-440-0858. To report oiled shoreline, please call 1-866-448-5816 and e-mail Emergency Management at Emergency-Management@santarosa.fl.gov.

My business has been affected by the spill, will I be reimbursed?
Reimbursement for losses is a possibility. We encourage businesses to keep detailed records of any losses they may incur. To discuss spill related damage, please call 1-800-440-0858.

How do I help?
For volunteer information, please call 1-866-448-5816 or locally register at 982-5223.

Where can I donate items for wildlife cleanup?
The Volunteer Reception Center operated through Help Thy Neighbors is collecting items for wildlife cleanup including:
o baby blankets
o
towels
o
heating pads (without auto shut-off if possible)
o
large Rubbermaid containers with lids
o
heating lamps, Rubbermaid troughs (can be purchased at Tractor Supply in Crestview or online)
o
large backyard portable pools
C
all the Volunteer Reception Center at (850) 983-5223 for drop off locations or additional information.

I (or my business) have a boat or other equipment and want to help. Who do I contact?
BP is looking to contract shrimp boats, oyster boats and other vessels for hire through the Vessel of Opportunities Program to deploy boom in the Gulf of Mexico. For more information (425) 745-8017

Where can I get information about training classes?
We are working to schedule classes. Information will be posted as soon as it becomes available.

Are the local waterways going to be closed to boat traffic?
Boom placement and tides will affect the waterways. There is no area scheduled for closing at this time.

Can I still fish in the bays and bayous?
Yes, however please be cautious of booms and report any oil or oil smells encountered. NOAA is restricting fishing for a minimum of ten days on Sunday, May 2, in federal waters most affected by the BP oil spill, largely between Louisiana state waters at the mouth of the Mississippi River to waters off Florida’s Pensacola Bay.

Where can I find information about jobs?
Call Workforce EscaRosa at (850) 983-5325 or online at www.employflorida.com.

When and where are meetings about the incident scheduled?
Scheduled meetings will be advertised through the media and posted on our Web page at www.santarosa.fl.gov.

Other Contact Numbers
• Transocean hotline: 832-587-8554

MI Swaco hotline: 888-318-6765

BP Investor Relations: 381-366-3123

BP family hotline: 281-36-578

BP third party contractor hotline: 281-366-5578
For More Information
www.santarosa.fl.gov/oilspill
www.deepwaterhorizonresponse.com
# # #
Kenny Wilder
NavarreBeachLife.com ~ Owner/Administrator
Constitutional Conservative
Florida Master Naturalist ~ Coastal Systems and Wetlands
Forum Rules and Regulations (Terms of Service)
Are You Going to Heaven?
User avatar
Kenny Wilder
Power User
Power User
Posts: 7068
Joined: Thu Aug 24, 2006 4:52 pm
Location: Navarre, Florida
Contact:

Fri May 07, 2010 8:05 pm

Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Update #8

For Navarre Beach and Santa Rosa County
www.santarosa.fl.gov/oilspill
Kenny Wilder
NavarreBeachLife.com ~ Owner/Administrator
Constitutional Conservative
Florida Master Naturalist ~ Coastal Systems and Wetlands
Forum Rules and Regulations (Terms of Service)
Are You Going to Heaven?
User avatar
Kenny Wilder
Power User
Power User
Posts: 7068
Joined: Thu Aug 24, 2006 4:52 pm
Location: Navarre, Florida
Contact:

Sat May 08, 2010 7:38 am

Santa Rosa County's oil boom plan rejected

Pensacola News Journal
Carmen Paige • cpaige@pnj.com • May 8, 2010


PageSanta Rosa County's plans to use booms to protect its shoreline from the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico has been rejected.

Commissioners on Friday learned about the decision through a conference call with the state's emergency operations center 15 minutes before a meeting to talk about placing booms near four bridges.

"We were told no reasonable request would be denied, and BP Oil has no role in the process," said Chairman Gordon Goodin. "But today, it seems like BP does."

Santa Rosa's plan was approved Thursday by the Unified Command. Commissioners — upset by Friday's change of events — are trying to find out who denied it and why.

"I think it's about cost," Goodin said. "If that's true, then BP Oil is not living up to its responsibility."

BP is cleaning up the spill. It was leasing the drilling rig Deepwater Horizon that exploded April 20, killing 11 workers and blowing out a well.

It's not the first setback this week for the Pensacola Bay Area as leaders work to save the shoreline and inland waterways.

Escambia County wants to move sand high on Pensacola Beach and out of danger from the oil spill, then push it back once the oil is cleaned from the beach. The plan would also steepen a section of the beach along the shoreline. That plan awaits approval from the state Department of Environmental Protection. Escambia County's boom plan has been approved.

Santa Rosa's plan would have placed booms across the Bob Sikes, Pensacola Bay, Garcon Point and Interstate 10 bridges.

"The plan initially approved by the Unified Command calls for the deployment of less than 10 miles of boom to provide our best chance of protecting (a) priceless resource," Commissioner Lane Lynchard wrote in a letter Friday to Gov. Charlie Crist.

Once the oil is in the ways and waterways, it is too late, Lynchard wrote.

"We need action," he said. "We need help. We have only one chance to stop intrusion and that is to get this plan implemented before the oil arrives."

No impact to the area is expected this weekend, and the beaches have not been affected by the oil spill, county officials said.

Chris Olson, the BP representative in Santa Rosa, pledged to work with commissioners and to keep communication lines open.

But, commissioners had heated words for BP officials.

Goodin said the $25 million BP has given Florida for response costs is not enough. He said $125 million would be a better starting figure.

"If BP is sincere, they would have given Florida more than $25 million for 16 counties," he said.

Preliminary estimates for Santa Rosa's plan exceed $6 million per month, which is more than 12 percent of the county's ad valorem tax revenue, Lynchard said in his letter.

"Given the open-ended need for protection we now face, as an elected official, I cannot commit the county to such an obligation without guarantees in place that we will be reimbursed," he said. "I am faced with an untenable choice, either do nothing and leave our fate to chance or implement the plan and risk bankrupting the county."

Commissioner Don Salter wants citizens to let the commissioners know what to do if the county cannot be guaranteed funding.

"Are you going to be with us if we stick our neck out?" he said.

Yes, said Andrea McDermott, a condominium association manager on Navarre Beach.

"We need to take care of ourselves," she said. "If we wait on (BP), we will be waiting a long time. By then, things will be destroyed and we will not be able to come back."
Kenny Wilder
NavarreBeachLife.com ~ Owner/Administrator
Constitutional Conservative
Florida Master Naturalist ~ Coastal Systems and Wetlands
Forum Rules and Regulations (Terms of Service)
Are You Going to Heaven?
User avatar
Kenny Wilder
Power User
Power User
Posts: 7068
Joined: Thu Aug 24, 2006 4:52 pm
Location: Navarre, Florida
Contact:

Tue May 11, 2010 11:17 am

BREAKING NEWS FROM SANTA ROSA COUNTY ABOUT NAVARRE BEACH

Posted: Monday, May 10, 2010 at 4:00 PM

Information Only


Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Update #10 is now available at www.santarosa.fl.gov/oilspill.
Kenny Wilder
NavarreBeachLife.com ~ Owner/Administrator
Constitutional Conservative
Florida Master Naturalist ~ Coastal Systems and Wetlands
Forum Rules and Regulations (Terms of Service)
Are You Going to Heaven?
User avatar
Kenny Wilder
Power User
Power User
Posts: 7068
Joined: Thu Aug 24, 2006 4:52 pm
Location: Navarre, Florida
Contact:

Tue May 11, 2010 5:19 pm

BREAKING NEWS FROM SANTA ROSA COUNTY ABOUT NAVARRE BEACH

Posted: Posted: Tuesday, May 11, 2010 at 5:10 PM

Information Only


Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Update #11 is now available at www.santarosa.fl.gov/oilspill.
Kenny Wilder
NavarreBeachLife.com ~ Owner/Administrator
Constitutional Conservative
Florida Master Naturalist ~ Coastal Systems and Wetlands
Forum Rules and Regulations (Terms of Service)
Are You Going to Heaven?
Post Reply

Return to “2010 GULF Oil Spill ”