Santa Rosa Count gets $1.76 million for beach renourishment

2016 Navarre Beach Renourishment Project and the 2006 Navarre Beach Restoration Project. And updates/issues about beach storm surge sand erosion, dune vegetation, sea turtle/shorebird nesting and other.
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Kenny Wilder
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Thu Mar 28, 2013 9:36 am

Santa Rosa County gets $1.76 million for beach renourishment

ImageHurricane Isaac Storm Surge – August 29, 2012
Navarre Beach, Florida – Photo by Kenny Wilder
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By DUSTY RICKETTS / Daily News
Published: Wednesday, March 27, 2013 at 18:38 PM.


NAVARRE BEACH — Santa Rosa County has received $1.76 million from the Federal Emergency Management Agency to replace sand on the beach that was washed away during Tropical Storm Debby last June.

Navarre Beach lost about 61,000 cubic yards of sand during the storm, Santa Rosa County Engineer Roger Blaylock said. The FEMA money will require about $600,000 in matching funds split evenly between the county and the state.

Santa Rosa started planning a new full beach restoration project last year that will begin at the end of this year or early next year. Rather than conduct an emergency renourishment project, Blaylock said the county is considering rolling that job into the full restoration project and using the FEMA money to help offset the $10.3 million cost.

The full renourishment project being planned will be about half the size and cost of the initial beach restoration work the county completed in 2006.

“We’re not having to build new dunes,” Blaylock said. “The 14½-foot dunes are still intact. It’s just the seaward beach has eroded away, which is what it was designed to do.”

Navarre Beach also lost sand during Hurricane Isaac last August. The county applied last month for $764,000 in disaster assistance elated to Isaac.

“We look forward to getting a timely response from FEMA relative to Hurricane Isaac and then discussing it with the board about the timing of our renourishment project and using these funds to offset the major project,” Blaylock said.

County Commissioners will have to decide how they want to move forward with the job. The county’s consulting team has already begun the permitting work for the full project and plans will have to be developed.

One of the biggest hurdles will be figuring out how to fund it.

The 2006 beach restoration project added 3.4 million cubic yards of sand to 3.7 miles of Navarre Beach. It cost about $21 million, with the state funding $12.6 million. Navarre Beach leaseholders paid about $7 million through a municipal services benefit unit and the county funded slightly more than $1.5 million.

Blaylock said the Florida Department of Environmental Protection has told the county that it will not to fund as much of the project as in 2006.

The city of Destin also has applied to FEMA for disaster assistance funds from Hurricane Isaac to recoup the added cost of its recently completed beach restoration project on Holiday Isle.

The project was originally expected to cost $6.77 million, but Isaac eroded the beach further. Additional sand was needed to complete the work, which added $700,000 to the bill. The final cost was $7.5 million.

“We haven’t heard back from FEMA,” said Lindey Chabot, Destin’s grants and projects manager. “We assume that it will be approved, but we don’t know that yet.”

Walton County did not have enough erosion to ask for help from FEMA, said county spokesman Louis Svehla.

Contact Daily News Business Editor Dusty Ricketts at 850-315-4448 or dricketts@nwfdailynews.com. Follow him on Twitter @DustyRnwfdn.
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Thu Mar 28, 2013 12:57 pm

I don't know what to say.

Is that enough?
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Thu Mar 28, 2013 1:23 pm

Brian,

That was my initial response as well. Not sure if that is enough, or that it is needed at all or will this just be a repeatable procedure? Many thoughts and questions. Personally, I am not a fan of building on a barrier island. Sure, there are benefits and I have certainly benefited but had they banned it decades ago and just had properties on the mainland to rent and then go to the island for the day....I would have been very cool with that as well. I would prefer to let nature manage the sand on the island but I know that is not a possibility now.

Unfortunately, it is only a matter of time (may it be an extended period of time) before the island is hit by another major hurricane. That's just the fact, Jack!

I hope this does not happen during my term as Mayor of Navarre and my appointment to the highest office of the Grand PooBah of the Mardi Gras Parade. They will say I brought bad luck and will not re-elect me!! :lol:
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Thu Mar 28, 2013 1:35 pm

IT'S A START!

I sincerely believe that this “START” will result in all the funding necessary to start the beach re-nourishment that we need. Regardless of what your opinion is the renourishment project will happen. I support the renourishment project 100%.

Continuing to discuss what we should have done 50 years ago is in the past. Had I been around back then I would have used my efforts to not allow any commercial buildings, condos or beach houses south of Gulf Blvd. That did not happen and that’s not going to happen in the future, because of the millions of dollars already invested on Navarre Beach.

Let’s Roll Tide (no pun intended).
Last edited by Kenny Wilder on Thu Mar 28, 2013 1:48 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Thu Mar 28, 2013 1:42 pm

I guess my question is....do we need a start? I know it has receded since 2006 but I have also seen much beach being placed back, naturally. I wonder if we could pocket or bank that money and let it grow a bit (well...sorry, don't know what I was thinking. If you have any money in any account, guess who wants a piece of it) and use it later?
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Thu Mar 28, 2013 1:50 pm

YES, WE NEED A START!

The beach needs the renourishment mainly to protect the beach berm (dune). The renourishment will assist in in a more successful survival rate of sea turtle egg hatchings, shorebird eggs, and other habitat.
Last edited by Kenny Wilder on Thu Mar 28, 2013 4:26 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Thu Mar 28, 2013 3:05 pm

I am not saying that a start INS'T needed, but is it enough?

A substantial project to put back a lot of beach would (knowing how these things are), require much more money and more than one machine (however amazing it may be), to do its thing at a time.

As is said, a barrier island is just that: a barrier. It has a job to do and by building on them we have to expect we will suffer from "disasters". At least we should "get it done" and don't mess around, the longer they wait, the more time for another major storm to come in (as they will) and make the eventual job that much more hard to do/expensive/time consuming or whatever other term you wish to use when they end up doing it - and raising the price & time needed along the way.
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Thu Mar 28, 2013 9:53 pm

Well, I think of it as "maintenance" to help it remain a "barrier" island. From what I've read in years past, this procedure has been found to work well in other areas that have similar waterway and run-off confluences as well as storm/beach erosion action. This has been common practice since the early 50's along the Eastern seaboard, and maybe other areas as well. The $$ amount sounds a bit light but reasonable if managed judiciously.

Personally, I believe in a stagnant growth plan for any barrier island w/replacement option with well-regulated insurance involvement but no previously unbuilt areas being added. Additionally, people know the risks and if they can't afford to own in a risk-prone area, they should not expect the rest of the taxpaying citizenry to bail them out for their bad decisions.

Just my 2 cents! LOL

A.G.
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Fri Mar 29, 2013 8:11 am

AngelGirl wrote:Well, I think of it as "maintenance" to help it remain a "barrier" island. From what I've read in years past, this procedure has been found to work well in other areas that have similar waterway and run-off confluences as well as storm/beach erosion action. This has been common practice since the early 50's along the Eastern seaboard, and maybe other areas as well. The $$ amount sounds a bit light but reasonable if managed judiciously.

Personally, I believe in a stagnant growth plan for any barrier island w/replacement option with well-regulated insurance involvement but no previously unbuilt areas being added. Additionally, people know the risks and if they can't afford to own in a risk-prone area, they should not expect the rest of the taxpaying citizenry to bail them out for their bad decisions.

Just my 2 cents! LOL

A.G.
Some very interesting points there, A.G.

I sort of like the idea of a zero net growth plan - at least it SOUNDS like it might help keep the barrier islands as barriers. I wonder... Don't know.

It does seem like the process now works to some degree, so why go through all the re-permitting and studies every few years, when we know what it is doing? I wonder if anyone here can provide an answer (apart form the cynical one of it being a revenue generator for the agencies involved)?

Insurance... Man! What a subject!! Watch out for the missiles. :wink:

The place on the island is insured and paid for through the HOA fees (there is no choice but to pay for it), and I think as an owner on the beach, you must KNOW what is blowing in during the few storm seasons, so all the extra insurances should be mandatory.
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Fri Mar 29, 2013 8:44 pm

During my recent Navarre Beach photos sessions, I noticed severe errosion around Lifeguard Station #2. I think the authorities should start making a dent in replacing some of the sand or the next storm will wipe out the berms.

Better START now...before it is too late.

~Jeff
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Sat Mar 30, 2013 9:42 am

That makes a lot of sense ... sooner is better than "later" as "later" also means MORE EXPENSIVE to correct! The "stitch in time saves nine" philosophy!

:?
A.G.
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Thu Jul 04, 2013 9:32 am

Just looking at the beach web cam and looking to the west, the waves appear to be all the way up to the bottom of the walk over steps. Looking the other way it seems pretty well 'normal'.

I am used to walking along there and having at least 30' or so of sand between the berms and the sea. Now I know things have got worse this last year and I did see online that high tide was only a couple of hours ago, but its not what passes for normal at N.B. for the tide to be all THAT, high is it?

Can our resident nature experts explain how often and/or why the seas level (gulf level :wink: ) changes so that one day there is plenty of sand between the sea and the berms and the next none at all? This just seems unusual for Navarre is all.......
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Thu Jul 04, 2013 10:02 am

Our current beach storm surge is equivalent to a tropical storm. At my home on the Sound the water surge is as high as Hurricane Isaac last August 2012. Just normal stuff folks…the storm surge will recede in a few days. I’m not exactly an expert, but I am certified as a Florida Master Naturalist for Coastal (beaches/bays) and Wetlands.

STAY OUT OF THE WATER AT THE BEACH TODAY...DANGEROUS RIP TIDES!
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Thu Jul 04, 2013 2:30 pm

Even wading in the water should be discouraged. If you are in water deep enough to be knocked over by an in-coming wave, you could also be caught up in a rip tide.
May your troubles be less, and your blessings be more, and nothing but happiness come through your door.
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Thu Jul 04, 2013 2:58 pm

Thanks for the input guys.

Not actually living on the beach right now, means I don't get to see the natural cycles of things, so your knowledge is important to help interpret what is going on.
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